Senna glycoside

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Senna glycosides)
Jump to: navigation, search
Senna glycoside
Clinical data
Trade names Ex-Lax Maximum Strength, Ex-Lax, Geri-kot, GoodSense Senna Laxative, Natural Senna Laxative, Perdiem Overnight Relief, Senexon, Senna Lax, Senna Laxative, Senna Maximum Strength, Senna Smooth, Senna-Gen, Senna-GRX, Senna-Lax, Senna-Tabs, Senna-Time, SennaCon, Senno, Senokot To Go, Senokot XTRA, Senokot [1]
AHFS/Drugs.com Multum Consumer Information
Pregnancy cat.
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code A06AB06
Chemical data
Formula ?
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Senna glycosides or sennosides are a number of anthraquinone derivatives useful as a laxative. They are dimeric glycosides named after their abundant occurrence in plants of the genus Senna. Senna is considered a stimulant laxative. Senna derivatives act on the large intestine, or colon, to stimulate fluid secretion and large contractions of the colonic wall known as peristalsis.[3]

It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, a list of the most important medication needed in a basic health system.[4]

Medical uses[edit]

Senna is used for the short term treatment of symptomatic constipation. It may also be used to aide in the evacuation of the bowel prior to surgery or invasive rectal or colonic examinations.[5][6]

Contraindications[edit]

According to Commission E, the German equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Senna is contraindicated in cases of intestinal obstruction, acute intestinal inflammation (e.g., Crohn's disease), colitis ulcerosa, appendicitis, and abdominal pain of unknown origin.[7]

Senna is considered contraindicated in patients with a documented allergy to anthraquinones. Such allergies are rare and typically limited to dermatological reactions of redness and itching.[8]

Administration[edit]

It should be taken once daily at bedtime.[9][10] Oral senna products typically produce a bowel movement in 6 to 12 hours. Rectal suppositories act within 2 hours.[11]

Adverse effects[edit]

Adverse effects are typically limited to gastrointestinal reactions and include abdominal pain or cramps, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting.[12] Regular use of senna products can lead to a characteristic brown pigmentation of the internal colonic wall seen on invasive imaging such as colonoscopy. This abnormal pigmentation is known as "melanosis coli."[13]

Mechanism of action[edit]

The breakdown products of senna act directly as irritants on the colonic wall to induce fluid secretion and colonic contraction.[14]

Formulations[edit]

Senna is an Over the Counter (OTC) medication that is available in multiple formulations including: • oral formations (liquid, tablet, granular) • rectal suppository(injection)

Senna products are manufactured by multiple generic drug makers as various brand names.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lexicomp Online, Lexi Drugs Online, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 17, 2014.
  2. ^ Drugs.com http://www.drugs.com/ppa/senna.html
  3. ^ McQuaid KR. Chapter 15. Gastrointestinal Disorders. In: Papadakis MA, McPhee SJ, Rabow MW. eds. CURRENT Medical Diagnosis & Treatment 2014. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2014. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=330&Sectionid=44291017. Accessed April 18, 2014.
  4. ^ "WHO Model List of EssentialMedicines". World Health Organization. October 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2014. 
  5. ^ Lexicomp Online, Lexi Drugs Online, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 17, 2014.
  6. ^ Drugs.com http://www.drugs.com/ppa/senna.html
  7. ^ Lexicomp Online, Lexi Drugs Online, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 17, 2014.
  8. ^ Lexicomp Online, Lexi Drugs Online, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 17, 2014.
  9. ^ Lexicomp Lexicomp Online, Lexi Drugs Online, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 17, 2014.
  10. ^ Drugs.com http://www.drugs.com/ppa/senna.html
  11. ^ McQuaid KR. Chapter 62. Drugs Used in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Diseases. In: Katzung BG, Masters SB, Trevor AJ. eds. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12e. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2012. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=388&Sectionid=45764290. Accessed April 18, 2014.
  12. ^ Lexicomp Online, Lexi Drugs Online, Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; April 17, 2014.
  13. ^ McQuaid KR. Chapter 62. Drugs Used in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Diseases. In: Katzung BG, Masters SB, Trevor AJ. eds. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12e. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2012. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=388&Sectionid=45764290. Accessed April 18, 2014.
  14. ^ Sharkey KA, Wallace JL. Chapter 46. Treatment of Disorders of Bowel Motility and Water Flux; Anti-Emetics; Agents Used in Biliary and Pancreatic Disease. In: Brunton LL, Chabner BA, Knollmann BC. eds. Goodman & Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 12e. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2011. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=374&Sectionid=41266256. Accessed April 18, 2014.
  15. ^ Drugs.com http://www.drugs.com/ppa/senna.html

External links[edit]