Sheldon Epps

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Sheldon Epps
Born (1952-11-15) November 15, 1952 (age 62)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Occupation Television director, theatre director
Years active 1981-present

Sheldon Epps (born November 15, 1952) is an American television and theatre director.

Career[edit]

Sheldon Epps was born in Los Angeles, California.[1] He moved to Teaneck, New Jersey, when he was 11 years old, where he attended the local public schools, and was first drawn to the stage while at Teaneck High School. Epps graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in 1973.[2]

He began his career as an actor studying at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Indiana Repertory Company, the Alley Theatre, Civic Light Opera of Pittsburgh[1] and The Production Company which he co-founded and for which he directed a number of plays.[3]

In 1980, Epps made his theater directorial debut with the Off Broadway musical Blues in the Night. It was revived in 1982, this time on Broadway. Since then he has directed a number of other stage productions on Broadway and in regional theaters namely Scenes and Revelations, Play On!, Blue and Purlie.

In 1994, Epps moved to television, directing an episode of Evening Shade. His other television credits include Smart Guy, Sister, Sister, Frasier, Everybody Loves Raymond, Friends, Girlfriends and George Lopez.

In 1997, Epps became artistic director of the Pasadena Playhouse.[3] Despite the financial trouble the Playhouse has endured since the 1980s, Epps has continued his role in bringing back the popularity of theater to the venue.[4]

Directing work[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sheldon Epps Biography at FilmReference.com
  2. ^ Klein, Alvin. "The Duke and I", The New York Times, March 30, 1997. Accessed October 17, 2011. "BORN 44 years ago to St. Paul (a minister who always found someplace to preach) and Kathryn Epps (who taught home economics in Thomas Jefferson Junior High School in Teaneck), Sheldon Epps lived in Los Angeles until he was 11. We moved to Teaneck when I was in the seventh grade, and there I stayed through junior high school and through college, he said.... He discovered theater when he performed in a summer musical program at Teaneck High School."
  3. ^ a b A Conversation with Sheldon Epps - California Institute of Technology
  4. ^ Patt Morrison, "Sheldon Epps: Play it again", Los Angeles Times, February 26, 2010
  5. ^ Sheldon Epps at Broadway World

External links[edit]