Surly Brewing Company

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Surly Brewing Company
Location Brooklyn Center, Minnesota
United States
SurlyBrewing.com
Opened 2005
Owner(s) Omar Ansari
Active beers
Name Type
Bender Brown Ale
Furious India Pale Ale
CynicAle Saison
Coffee Bender Coffee Infused Brown ale
Hell German Style Munich Helles
Seasonal beers
Name Type
Mild English Brown Ale-Dark Mild
Schadenfreude German Style Dunkel Lager
Bitter Brewer English Bitter
SurlyFest Rye Beer
Wet Wet Hopped American IPA
Abrasive Double Oat IPA
Other beers
Name Type
Special Release beers
Darkness Russian Imperial Stout
Smoke Oak Aged Smoked Baltic Porter
Bandwagon West Coast IPA
Tea Bagged Furious Dry Hopped Cask India Pale Ale
Tea Bagged Bender Dry Hopped Cask Brown Ale
Pentagram Wine Barrel-Aged Brett Dark Ale
One Time Release beers
Sausage Fest Smoked Belgian
One Imperial Lager
Two Cranberry-Infused Dark Ale
Three Braggot
Four Milk / Sweet Stout
Five Wine Barrel-Aged Brett Dark Ale
Syx American Strong Ale

The Surly Brewing Company is a Brooklyn Center, Minnesota-based craft brewery, noted for well-reviewed beers and primarily canning, rather than bottling.[1] As of November 2013 it is available only in and around the Minneapolis–Saint Paul metropolitan area and in and around Chicago.[1] Surly has been growing rapidly; it had a projected production of over 15,000 barrels in 2010,[2] 21,000 in 2012, and 28,000 in 2013.[1] Due to growth in demand outstripping supply, it was pulled from the Chicago market (to better serve its home market) from June 2010 to November 2013.[2][1]

Surly's brewing system is a 30 beer barrel (BBL) Sprinkman, one of four identical systems produced by Sprinkman of Wisconsin.[3]

History[edit]

Surly Brewing Co. founder Omar Ansari had been homebrewing since 1994. After apprenticing at New Holland Brewing Company in Michigan and enlisting Todd Haug of Minneapolis's Rock Bottom Brewery, Surly Brewing began brewing in Brooklyn Center.[4]

In February 2011, Surly announced that it intended to open a restaurant and beer garden, which was expected to cost US$20 million. The new facility would also increase its brewing capacity to approximately 100,000 barrels. This type of installation was not in line with Minnesota's liquor laws, however. With the help of the Surly Nation, fans of the brewery's beer, some members of the Minnesota Legislature were convinced to propose changes in order to allow it. Minnesota's three-tier liquor sales system would not allow breweries to distribute their beer for retail sale and sell on the brewery's premises, as a brewpub does.[5] After just a few months, changes to Minnesota's liquor laws that would allow Surly to sell beer for consumption at the proposed BrewPub, were passed in an omnibus liquor bill introduced by Rep. Jenifer Loon (R - Eden Prairie) and Sen. Linda Scheid (DFL - Brooklyn Park).[6] Known as the "Surly Bill", this bill was signed into law by Governor Mark Dayton on May 25, 2011. [7]

Surly purchased an 8.3 acre plot of land in Prospect Park, Minneapolis for $20 million in April 2013. A destination brewery that "could open by 2014" is planned for the site. Surly secured $2 million in environmental mediation grants from Hennepin County to address more than a century's worth of accumulated industrial pollution at the site.[8]

In November 2013, Surly expanded to include the Chicago market, being offered at over one hundred different bars, restaurants, and liquor stores in the Chicagoland metropolitan area. This expansion included canned and kegged Surly Cynic, Hell, Bender, Overrated, and Coffee Bender, with some Chicagoland liquor stores carrying select Surly specialities when available. [9][1]

Honors[edit]

Esquire magazine selected Surly Brewing Company's CynicAle 16 ounce as one of the "Best Canned Beers to Drink Now" in a February, 2012 article.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Surly Brewing to return to Chicago, Chicago Tribune, November 07, 2013, Josh Noel
  2. ^ a b Sudo, Chuck. "Citing Need To Meet Demand In Home State, Surly Brewing Pulls Beer From Chicago Market". Chicagoist. Chicago: Gothamist, LLC. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  3. ^ Shepard, Robin. Minnesotas Best Breweries Brewpubs: Searching for the Perfect Pint. Madison, Wis.: The University of Wisconsin Press. p. 118. ISBN 978-0-299-28244-8. 
  4. ^ "Brewery: History". Surly Brewing Co. Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  5. ^ Lussenhop, Jessica (February 9, 2011). "Surly's $20 million dream brewery: A first look". City Pages. Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  6. ^ "Cheers to passage of the 'Surly bill'". Star Tribune. May 30, 2011. Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  7. ^ Lussenhop, Jessica (May 25, 2011). "Surly bill is now law". City Pages. Retrieved 2013-02-26. 
  8. ^ Roper, Eric (April 15, 2013). "Surly buys Minneapolis site for $20 million brewery". Star Tribune. 
  9. ^ Surly Brewing. "Get Surly in the Chicago Metro Area". Surly. Retrieved 3/5/14. 
  10. ^ "Best Canned Beers to Drink Now". Esquire magazine via Yahoo news website. 2012-02-22. Retrieved 2012-02-22. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°2′34.38″N 93°19′27.2″W / 45.0428833°N 93.324222°W / 45.0428833; -93.324222