Talk:AK-47

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Former featured article AK-47 is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on September 22, 2006.

Flag[edit]

I feel that the fact that the AK-47 is on the Flag of Mozambique needs to be mentioned more prominently, in the lead or shortly thereafter. Any objections? Abductive (reasoning) 18:37, 23 December 2013 (UTC)

  • I disagree. It's mere trivia, and doesn't merit more than a short mention. Thomas.W talk to me 18:43, 23 December 2013 (UTC)

There is no such thing as AK-47![edit]

Title. The gun is "AK" or Automat Kalashnikova. No "-47". Look at Russian article. However, AK-74 is correct naming. 93.129.8.114 (talk) 00:19, 10 March 2014 (UTC) This comment "More recently they have been seen in the hands of Islamic groups such as the Taliban and Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Iraq." is non-factual and is simply pure conjecture and nothing more. If we the people have to prove what we write here, so does wikipedia reps and others. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.82.83.2 (talk) 22:10, 21 March 2014 (UTC)

About the article's name again[edit]

AK-47 was never entered service because it was just a prototype for the competition. The final version entered service in 1949 and was called 7.62mm avtomat Kalashnikova or just AK, not AK-47. You can't find "AK-47" mentioned in the weapons manuals and it wasn't called so even unofficially in the Soviet/Russian military forces. In other words, it's just wrong and the fact that "well, people widely use it" doesn't make any difference, though we could, no, must mention it in the article instead of spreading another misconception. Insjke (talk) 16:05, 12 June 2014 (UTC)

Remove problem sentence[edit]

I recommend that we remove the last sentence from the first paragraph (please see below in bold)...This sentence is not necessarily and is the source of repeated edit reverts. Specifically, editors are changing "AK-74" to "AK-47"

The AK-47 is a selective-fire, gas-operated 7.62×39mm assault rifle, first developed in the Soviet Union by Mikhail Kalashnikov. It is officially known in the Soviet documentation as Avtomat Kalashnikova (Russian: Автомат Калашникова). It is also known as Kalashnikov, AK, or in Russian slang, Kalash. No number was present in the Soviet military nomenclature for Kalashnikov's assault rifles until the adoption of the AK-74........--RAF910 (talk) 00:37, 22 August 2014 (UTC)

Yes, definitely should be removed.--Dmol (talk) 02:39, 22 August 2014 (UTC)
The information within the sentence is encyclopedic. It's also part of the reason why I tried to go in more detail with my first version.
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AK-47&oldid=613144916
People just don't believe that AK can go without 47 in the russian nomenclature.
I'd suggest to add a small section in the "history" part of the article if this is too long for the headline.--83.21.165.27 (talk) 14:05, 24 August 2014 (UTC)
Also look at the last two discussion topics. If we state clearly that the russians never used "AK-47", I think we get closer to a consensus and avoid people who do multiple edits claiming "there ain't no AK-47 thingy".--83.21.165.27 (talk) 14:40, 24 August 2014 (UTC)

You are confusing two different issues.

The first issue, is renaming the article to Avtomat Kalashnikova because some editors believe there is no such thing as an AK-47. Despite the fact that this is the English language page...despite the fact that Wiki common name policy applies...and despite the fact that the manufacture itself calls the gun AK-47 (see http://www.izhmash.ru/eng/product/akm.shtml).

The second issue, the second and third sentences in this article clearly states "It is officially known in the Soviet documentation as Avtomat Kalashnikova (Russian: Автомат Калашникова). It is also known as Kalashnikov, AK, or in Russian slang, Kalash." And, that the next sentence "No number was present in the Soviet military nomenclature for Kalashnikov's assault rifles until the adoption of the AK-74." is needlessly causing confusion and resulting in unnecessary edit reverts. In fact, it has already been reverted once more while this discussion has been taking place. Also, there is simply no reason to restate this info over and over again.

In the English speaking world, this rifle is called the AK-47, manufacture itself calls it the AK-47 (see http://www.izhmash.ru/eng/product/akm.shtml), and 100 years from now it will still be called the AK-47. There is nothing that Wikipedia can do to change this simple fact, no matter how hard some editors may wish it so.--RAF910 (talk) 00:47, 25 August 2014 (UTC)

-I don't see the problem with going into more detail about the name, or more exacly what the name wasn't for russians. If anything the confusion caused by this sentence proves that more precision is needed for people to understand.
The manufacture started to call it AK-47 fairly recently, on its English website, due precisely to the influence of the English speaking world (read: customers)
I'd even say that it's quite an interesting issue in the field of linguistics on how what was first an error in "translation" (since the AK-47 for the russians was a prototype) became the normal name in English and then got to influence the original. And I think that the etymology of the name is something that has its place in an encyclopedia.
You'll also notice that maybe because the issue of the name is never tackled in the article, we don't have a mention of the names of the prototypes (AK-46, 47, 48). As these would be even more confusing for an English speaker without a bit of explanation. Telling someone that the AK-47 was a prototype for the AK-47 would be just weird, especially if you go on to say there was an AK-48 afterwards --83.8.187.81 (talk) 12:19, 25 August 2014 (UTC)

Again, the article already states "It is officially known in the Soviet documentation as Avtomat Kalashnikova (Russian: Автомат Калашникова). It is also known as Kalashnikov, AK, or in Russian slang, Kalash." The following sentence "No number was present in the Soviet military nomenclature for Kalashnikov's assault rifles until the adoption of the AK-74." is needlessly causing confusion and resulting in unnecessary edit reverts.

The interesting linguistic translation is nonsense an irrelevant to the article. It is trivial information that is obviously confusing the reader. And, placed in the article and as you insinuated above as an off-hand slap at English speakers for not being smart enough to know what it's called in Russian.--RAF910 (talk) 14:15, 25 August 2014 (UTC)

Well, I'm open for suggestions on how you'd name the various prototypes (and that's not trivial for this article and needs to be done at some point) without adressing the issue of having homonyms.
Sure you can avoid mentioning them, but isn't it the purpose of an encyclopedia to give information?
I don't see where you got the idea that etymology is irrelevant. And having information that confuses the reader means it needs clarification, not deletion. --79.186.161.107 (talk) 16:22, 25 August 2014 (UTC)

This discussion is absolute proof to just how confusing this one sentence is...Again, the article already states "It is officially known in the Soviet documentation as Avtomat Kalashnikova (Russian: Автомат Калашникова). It is also known as Kalashnikov, AK, or in Russian slang, Kalash." The following sentence "No number was present in the Soviet military nomenclature for Kalashnikov's assault rifles until the adoption of the AK-74." is needlessly causing confusion and resulting in unnecessary edit reverts. Please note, that nowhere in the sentence in question is the word prototype used...yet we now have editors (see above) that have somehow read prototype into the sentence. Also, the sentence is unreferenced and inaccurate as the manufacture itself calls it the rifle the AK-47 (see http://www.izhmash.ru/eng/product/akm.shtml).--RAF910 (talk) 00:40, 26 August 2014 (UTC)

The word prototype was present in this version:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AK-47&oldid=613144916
For some reason you had problems with it, so I changed it to the current version that you didn't at the time dispute.
So for the x-th time, I've got no problem with changing this sentence as it's demontrably confusing, but rather that deleting it I find preferable to expand on the informations that I mentionned.
And when did the manufacturer (or rather what's left of it after it's 2012 bankrupcy) become the Soviet army? I'd like to see any document from the USSR that refers by AK-47 to anything but a prototype. Also no need to repeat ad nauseam the same couple of sentences, it adds nothing to the discussion.--79.186.161.107 (talk) 01:41, 26 August 2014 (UTC)

AK-47 is the common name for this rifle. It is so common that the manufacture itself calls it the AK-47 (see http://www.izhmash.ru/eng/product/akm.shtml). Now you are claiming that the manufacture is not a reliable source information as to the name of the products that they make and sell. Clearly, you are a POV pusher and I will no longer entertain you. I will now delete the sentence in question--RAF910 (talk) 15:08, 27 August 2014 (UTC)

We're talking from the historical perspective here. If some marketing genius decides tomorrow that the product should be called cheese sandwich instead of AK-47 it has no bearing on the past.
And when did I say that AK-47 isn't the common name for this gun? I said there are prototypes reffered to by homonyms to AK-47, and there needs to be some explanation on the context of Soviet nomenclature in order to not cause confusion on the matter.
I'll add back the sentence in question. Now we can go play the good ol' edition war or wait and see what the rest of the community has to say about it.--83.20.35.25 (talk) 15:31, 27 August 2014 (UTC)