Talk:Asclepius

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Asklepios or Asclepius?[edit]

I think this article would be better moved to Asklepios. It is better to have a transliteration of the Greek (Asklepios), rather than an anglicisation of a Latin transliteration (Aesculapius). The form Asklepios would also aid readers who are not aware of the proper pronunciation. As such I propose moving this article to Asklepios. BodvarBjarki (talk) 15:15, 21 July 2009 (UTC)

The standard naming guideline for the English Wikipedia is the most common English name, which is Asclepius.--Prosfilaes (talk) 08:50, 20 October 2010 (UTC)
Newbie here, sorry. I think I put my comment in the wrong place. I don't know how to move it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Donnajpro (talkcontribs) 06:10, 24 June 2011 (UTC)
Moving; Asclepius is the accepted and popular spelling of the name. Asklepios is the more ancient Greek spelling. The name is spelled numerous ways. The numerous spellings could be listed or cross-referenced. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Donnajpro (talkcontribs) 06:08, 24 June 2011 (UTC)

Aratus[edit]

I don't think that the link to Aratus is correct...
The Aratus page is clearly talking about a different Aratus entirely.
If there is sufficient information about the son of Ascelpius, we should create a new page about him, called something like "Aratus (Mythology)" or "Aratus (Son of Asclepius)" or some such, and perhaps create a "Aratus (disambiguation)" page, but just linking to the WRONG page is just not a good solution IMHO.
Blueguy76 02:00, 19 June 2007 (UTC)

"Respectively"[edit]

The intro paragraph says "...his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Aglæa/Ægle and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing, respectively."

I don't think six people can map onto three attributes, "respectively." Could someone clarify this sentence? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Inhumandecency (talkcontribs) 06:41, 14 October 2008 (UTC)

Several months later, this problem remains. If it's easy to do, I'll try to correct it, but the article needs further development. For instance, Socrates' famous dying words about "a cock for Asclepius" aren't here. Cynwolfe (talk) 19:31, 25 July 2009 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

The section on etymology states several theories but that there is no consensus. The section on his birth states that Asklepios means "to cut open." I find the former statement more trustworthy, in part because the caesarion-etymology refers to a page with a peculiar idea of how to present sources (very long, no references to chapters or sections, but only the works in extenso). Hexmaster (talk) 07:02, 26 October 2008 (UTC)


The paragraph

"One might add that even though Szemerényi's etymology (Hitt. asula- + piya-) does not account for the velar, it is perhaps inserted spontaneously in Greek due to the fact that the cluster -sl- was uncommon in Greek: So, Aslāpios would become Asklāpios automatically."

is pure theorising. It is against the rules of Wikipedia. Please take it out. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.95.112.161 (talk) 03:09, 22 April 2010 (UTC)

The entire page needs crafting by someone who has done deeper research of the extant testimonies to Asclepius and made the Greco-Egyptian connections that link Greece to Egypt through the Corpus Hermeticum. The best source for Asclepius lore is the Edelstein and Edelstein volumes on Asclepius the Testimonies. There are very basic things that people need to know. This page has a lot of peripheral stuff on it that will only confuse. Also, Telesphoros was not a son of Asclepius. This is a deep subject that has its origin in the mysteries. Try researching the Cabiri. There is collected information on Asclepius and Imhotep beginning to be made available at a web site called STARTISTICS if the page author wants help. Feel free to info shop. I have not yet added the information I collected and postulated about the Cabir Telesphoros. It's pretty deep. Donnajpro (talk) 06:22, 24 June 2011 (UTC)

As anyone seen the obvious?...[edit]

I know Wikipedia frowns upon original investigation, but what I'm about to say is so basic and (I guess) obvious I'll even be ashamed if anyone labels it "original investigation"...

I think it's rather strange that no one noticed that the ending of Asklepios' name (gr. Ἀσκληπιός) is strikingly similar to his wife's (Epione, gr. Ἠπιόνη). Epione was the (demi)goddess of soothing; well, in Greek the adjective Ήπιος means "benevolent, favorable; soothing, smoothing" — and it's quite obvious that this is both the root for Epione's name and the ending of Asklepios'... So, I think it's much more reasonable that Asklepios' name is also related with soothing and the idea of a favorable god (good for your health) than any of those strange and rather far-fetched etymologies.

(I have no idea about the "Askl-" prefix. Often, "imported" deities have mixed names, each part in one language, and many times they both mean the same; unfortunately, I cannot suggest any candidate language for the prefix, so this last part is just speculation.) Gazilion (talk) 12:46, 20 January 2012 (UTC)

Imhotep?[edit]

There is a connection made at various times with Imhotep, mentioned in that article but not here. Detail and a cite would be appreciatd. +sj+ 00:53, 14 June 2009 (UTC)


Etymological legacy?[edit]

Something not mentioned here, but I find fascinating, is how we have adopted these names.

Hippocrates hypocrite

Hygieia hygiene

abaton abatoire


etc: etc: Can we have a section on this?

. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Narwhal2 (talkcontribs) 07:16, 6 November 2009 (UTC)

Parallels with Christianity section[edit]

I've removed this entire section until it can be better researched. The section was not meant to compare to Jesus, but was an attempt to make it look the story of Jesus was stolen from Asclepius. Why not compare Asclepius to other mythological figures? Why just Jesus? The intention was obvious. Various assertions were made without being sourced, and they were made too vague to be real comparisons. The main comparison was the healings done by both characters.

"Given the modern connotation of 'miracle,' it might appear misleading to so describe Asclepius's healings since he employed herbs (drugs and salves) and sometimes performed surgery. Moreover, Homer and Pindar say that Asclepius was educated in the healing arts by his centaur teacher, Chiron. Nevertheless the degree to which Asclepius' medicine is intertwined with magic and miracle is illustrated in Ovid's account of the healing of Hippolytus: 'Straightway he drew from an ivory casket simples that before had stood Glaucus' ghost in good stead….Thrice he touched the youth's breast, thrice he spoke healing words: then Hippolytus lifted his head'" Theios Aner and the Markan Miracle Traditions: A Critique of the Theios Aner Concept as an Interpretive Background of the Miracle Traditions Used by Mark. Barry Blackburn. Tubingen: Mohr, 1991. (revision of Ph.D thesis of 1986 for Univ. of Aberdeen]

Also, while I don't have the source on hand, the only pre-Christian sources of Asclepius raising someone from the dead was done using medicine. He is know as the god of medicine for a reason. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.51.151.159 (talk) 07:55, 29 November 2010 (UTC)

The "doubting Thomas" mentioned in the section was called Ambroja (spelled incorrectly). It should be Ambrosia. This "doubting Thomas" was a woman who was blind in one eye who went into one of his temples and saw some of the cures he was said to have preformed. She fell asleep and in a vision, Asclepius said he would heal her if she gave him an offering for her ignorance. She woke up and she was better. This would be a better comparison if she was one of Asclepius's followers but this seems to be a single case, long after Asclepius had died.68.51.151.159 (talk) 23:29, 29 November 2010 (UTC)