Talk:Dit da jow

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POV[edit]

Reguarding the liniment Dit Da Jow. I use Dit Da Jow myself, and it's good stuff, but this article still has major issues with POV. TallNapoleon (talk) 20:55, 22 October 2008 (UTC)

I heartily agree. "Kung fu practitioners found that repeated bruising caused stagnant blood and qi..." Look, I'm a kung fu student, but I seriously doubt the medical merit of those comments.12.199.244.100 (talk) 15:19, 3 March 2009 (UTC)

Regarding the passage quoted above, it's actually been plagiarized from Tom Bisio's book "A Tooth From the Tiger's Mouth" (ISBN: 0-7432-4551-2) page 175 and should probably be removed. ~3rickZann — Preceding unsigned comment added by 3rickZann (talkcontribs) 02:31, 1 September 2012 (UTC) Update: I went ahead and removed it. 3rickZann (talk) 02:42, 1 September 2012 (UTC)

Snake Oil[edit]

It's pretty interesting reading this article right after reading about Snake Oil. It's almost as if they were the same thing. "Secret ingredients" that mainly use camphor, etc. You would think that with modern day science, someone would put an end to this nonsense. Too bad culture and religion triumphs logic any day. 116.49.133.49 (talk) 16:02, 7 November 2013 (UTC)

Serious POV issues and unverifiable claims[edit]

This article has some extremely severe issues with how it presents medical claims without any verifiable sources. One of the biggest offenses is that many of the medical claims are backed up with primary medical sources that are not peer-reviewed, small-scale, and non-controlled. In other words, the sources used to back up medical claims on this article fail every guideline of WP:MEDRS possible.

In order to hopefully improve the quality of this article, I'm removing the offending sources and adding citation needed tags to medical claims that are not backed by reliable secondary sources. I've also added this article to Wikiproject Skepticism's watchlist in hopes that other editors can help find reliable sources for this article and remove claims that are not verifiable. Karzelek (talk) 23:30, 16 August 2014 (UTC)