Talk:Frame of reference

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I had a question as to whether there is a grand frame of reference or not. Because right now I'm sitting in a chair, on the earth, going around the sun, while at the same time, the solar system is revolving around the Milky Way. What's beyond that? Is there no frame of reference beyond the galaxy? I would think not because all of the galaxies are moving away from each other. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.73.54.139 (talk) 18:45, 29 June 2012 (UTC)

Section "Examples of inertial frames of reference"[edit]

While the car example is a good and understandable one, calling S and S' inertial frames of reference might be a little confusing, because both accelerate by 3 cm/s2 towards the centre of the Earth (and also slightly towards the Sun, etc). Would it be reasonable to work into the example how it's only approximately an inertial frame, but how it's a sufficiently good approximation for the problem, or would this needlessly complicate the example? 85.226.206.82 (talk) 17:59, 6 February 2013 (UTC)

Observational frame of reference[edit]

For the "observational frame of reference" concept, a frame of reference can be defined as a collection of three non-collinear points whose distance from one another remains constant. Can this be mentioned somewhere? 66.231.148.248 (talk) 11:29, 23 February 2013 (UTC)

With a good source, I guess it could be mentioned. - DVdm (talk) 11:45, 23 February 2013 (UTC)