Talk:Luther (2003 film)

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Luther's Weight[edit]

I've reverted a comment in the Historical Inaccuracies section which claims that it is a historical inaccuracy for Luther to be played by a "relatively skinny actor." Luther during the period portrayed in the film was, in fact, quite thin. Here is a sketch of Luther's appearance during this period: http://www.samford.edu/~tsmcginn/tf/images/young%20luther.gif

Actually bears a remarkable resemblance to Joseph Fiennes... ;)

HuronKing, November 23rd 2008 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.123.237.251 (talk) 05:28, 24 November 2008 (UTC)

The third historical inaccuracy[edit]

It looks like the by-standers who took and printed Luther's theses are not just ordinary commoners but students of theology. I think one of them can be seen in the scene showing Luther in the auditorium in Wittenberg university, sitting at the first desk (on spectator's right), in front of Karlstadt, just before the dispute over the salvation of the Greeks. All the more that they address Luther with "doctor", unlike any commoner who would probably say "father Martin". If they are in fact theology students, they could read latin and understand very well the importance of the theses. Although there's no other historical record of an actual nailing of the theses on the Castle Church door besides Philipp Melanchthon's words, in my opinion this scene does not contradict historical evidence. According to Wikipedia Ninety-Five Theses page "within two weeks, copies of the Theses had spread throughout Germany; within two months throughout Europe." — Preceding unsigned comment added by NBUPolSci F40198 (talkcontribs) 16:35, 24 February 2012 (UTC)