Talk:Mustard plant

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Merge proposal[edit]

Proposal: merge Mustard plant into Culinary mustard. Culinary mustard discusses mustard greens, so there seems to be an overlap between the two articles. Badagnani 05:01, 9 June 2006 (UTC)

Support... I agree entirely. Also, there seems to be no reason that the two articles should remain separate, even if redundancy was avoided. Culinary mustard is a derivative of the mustard plant.MrPMonday 00:06, 24 June 2006 (UTC)
Disagree: Botanically, mustard refers to an entire group of plants (cf. Brassica), only a few of which are used for food. Graham 23:18, 11 July 2006 (UTC)
This article actually ought to be merged with Brassica, not culinary mustard. Graham 23:27, 11 July 2006 (UTC)
Merge into both part fits into the culinary mustard#mustard green article, part fits into the brassica article. Gzuckier 14:19, 28 July 2006 (UTC)

yes, merge[edit]

In the course of writing out why the pages should remain seperate, I realized otherwise. Although the two pages cover somewhat disparate aspects of the topic right now, a well-organized page that dealt first with the botany and then uses through history culminating in current culinary practices would be easy to read, would prevent reiteration between two pages and would offer a more complete description of 'mustard' than either page ever would alone. As these pages grow, a merged page will remain clear and well-organized, whereas two different pages would get increasingly jumpy or redundant. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Radcen (talkcontribs) 02:38, 23 June 2006.

So I still think maybe a merge should occur. There are a lot of different plants that can be called Mustard, and it seems strange to have an article about the genus of plants, and then this article as well.--Andrew c 02:42, 13 October 2006 (UTC)

Disagree I disagree with merging this page with Culinary Mustard, because mustard plants produce other edibles such as mustard greens and mustard seeds (particularly important in Indian cuisine). Also, this page needs more information on the importance of mustard as a crop as well as the prevalence of wild mustard as a troublesome weed. If these were added, the page's importance would be enhanced. --Sofia Roberts 00:07, 14 November 2006 (UTC)

Disagree, yeah, I gotta agree that mustard the condiment is probably the most minor use of mustard the plant. Gzuckier 14:35, 14 November 2006 (UTC)

Thank you both for commenting. I agree that the mustard plant should not redirect to mustard condiment. However, we have articles on individual species, and families that are considered "mustard plant". There is some overlap. How exactly does this article differ from brassica?-Andrew c 17:16, 14 November 2006 (UTC)

You are welcome. I think the overlap arises because "mustard" applies to the generic name of the brassicas, a number of weeds, and some subsidiary uses of the plant. None of these apply to "rutabaga" or "bok choy." Mustard is, however, really comparable to these as a subset of brassicas. Ideally, all the plants that belong to the brassica family would have subheadings on the brassica page, and what we are calling here is the mustard family would be one of them, albeit with a longer entry. I disagree with merging it with brassicas, and one way to differentiate it more is to expand it as I mentioned above. --Sofia Roberts 18:21, 15 November 2006 (UTC)

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As a weed or pest plant?[edit]

Where I live, the mustards are wild and are weed-like, growing everywhere for months after a rainstorm with little to no water. No mention of that in the article? (I personally like the wild mustard, as wood and honey bees visit my yard to collect pollen.) Sierraoffline444 (talk) 20:42, 9 April 2010 (UTC)

eating the leaves[edit]

It is fairly common in the around the world for people to eat the leaves of this plant. It's also common for people in the US to eat them with collard greens... I was surprised to see no mention of eating of the leaves mentioned here. Dreammaker182 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 16:48, 14 October 2011 (UTC).

Major growers[edit]

I've deleted the claim that Canada is responsible for 90% of world mustard production and Saskatchewan for over 50%. If this was ever true (it was sourced to the Saskatchewan Mustard Development Commission, who have a vested interest and the claim did not appear on the page cited, when I checked), it doesn't seem to be any more. I replaced it with the statement that Canada and Nepal between them accounted for about 57% of world supply in 2010, sourced to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (unfortunately, no direct link is possible; select "countries by commodity", then choose "mustard seed" from the drop-down, and sort by quantity, rather than value). Strictly speaking, they account for 57% of the mustard seed produced by top-20 producers, rather than the world total but, since Canada and Nepal produced over 336,000t between them and the 20th-placed producer grew only 30t (one truck-load), producers beyond 20th place can only be growing a negligible amount between them. (150 more countries growing 30t each is still only 4,500t, under 1.5% of the Canada-Nepal total.)

The article currently claims, "oriental mustard (Brassica juncea), originally from the foothills of the Himalaya, is grown commercially in Canada, the UK, Denmark and the US; black mustard (Brassica nigra) is grown in Argentina, Chile, the US and some European countries." I believe that this statement needs revising, too. Of the countries listed, only Canada, the USA and Denmark appear in the FAO's top-20 producers and it's Denmark who is the 20th-place single-truckload grower. It appears, then, that Argentina, Chile, Denmark and the UK are not significant growers of any kind of mustard. However, I'm reluctant to edit this down to listing just Canada and the US. The other countries could, theoretically, still be significant producers if very little of that type of mustard is grown in the world. Other significant growers of mustard from the FAO are (from memory, as the FAO site won't talk to me, right now) Burma, Ukraine, Russia, China and France. Most likely, they should be mentioned ahead of the countries included in the article at the moment, if anyone can find what kind of mustard they actually grow. Dricherby (talk) 09:31, 8 May 2012 (UTC)