Talk:Noncentral hypergeometric distributions

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The entries for Fisher's noncentral hypergeometric distribution and Wallenius' noncentral hypergeometric distribution are written with the same writing style, terminology and parameter names in order to make it easier for readers to compare these very similar distributions. The overview entry noncentral hypergeometric distributions explains the difference between these two distributions.

Editors: Please keep these three articles closely coordinated.

Arnold90 15:37, 1 July 2007 (UTC)

This is a great article! Quite different from many wikipedia articles on statistics, this is REALLY understandable, even for beginners! Thanks a lot! --Maximilianh (talk) 11:04, 4 June 2008 (UTC)


Comparison charts[edit]

I am not sure the comparison with the central hypergeometric distribution is fair in the chart File:NoncentralHypergeometricCompare2.png as the odds for the Fisher distribution are adjusted to get a similar mean to the Wallenius distribution. You could get a similar curve if you adjusted the parameters of the central hypergeometric distribution too to try to match the means and variances of the other two, for example with something like m_1=63 and m_2=66 for that distribution. In fact you could get something quite close with a binomial distribution with n=55 and p=0.89 --Rumping (talk) 02:36, 12 January 2014 (UTC)