Talk:Targum Pseudo-Jonathan

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Targum Jonathan (today) and Pseudo-Jonathan are the same thing! Traditionally, it is called Targum Jonathan. Scholars simply want to emphasize that what is traditionally called Jonathan was actually not written by Jonathan b. Uziel and call it Pseudo-Jonathan. That's why the two entries should be merged. Sjavitt84 11:59, 9 December 2005 (UTC)

Not correct. "Jonathan" is on the prophets only according to the rabbinic tradition. That is the traditional name of this eastern (Babylonian) targum, and that is what modern scholars call it too (even if they do not take literally the tradition ascribing it to Jonathan ben Uzziel).
"Pseudo-Jonathan" is a western (Land of Israel) targum on the Torah alone. It is not called "Jonathan" in the rabbinic tradition, and only became known as such because of a printer's error, as explained in the article. Scholars call this, and only this, pseudo-Jonathan. Dovi 16:41, 10 December 2005 (UTC)
Would anyone have an objection to changing "scholars" to "academics" seeing that scholars can refer to both Rabbinical Scholars, who do not call the work Targum Pseudo-Jonathan, and secular academic scholars who do? 88.153.200.32 16:46, 13 January 2007 (UTC)
Shavua Tov. There is no argument here between the yeshiva world and the university. Serious rabbinic scholars (not just academics) know that according to an explicit statement in the gemara, Yonatan only composed a targum to Nevi'im, not to the Torah. Talmidei Chakhamim who are "in the know" about Targum (which is definitely not all Torah scholars) would call it "Meyuchas le-Yonatan" or something like that. However, you are right that this is not popularly known in the yeshiva world, and perhaps that could be appropriately noted. Dovi 18:25, 13 January 2007 (UTC)

Need to cite sources[edit]

This article needs to cite specific sources. It should also explain who Rieder and Gottlieb are, rather than just mentioning them by surname. - Fayenatic london (talk) 17:31, 2 April 2007 (UTC)