Talk:The Animatrix

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Kid's Story[edit]

Is it worth noting on the page the large number of similarities between Kid's Story and the Perchance to Dream episode of Batman: The Animated Series? Specifically, the method of escape from the dream world is very similar -- both involve jumping off a building to commit suicide in order to wake up. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.254.192.52 (talk) 06:35, 30 January 2010 (UTC)

Language[edit]

Isn't the Animatrix in languages other than Japanese? Should the other languages be added to the infobox?

Anime?[edit]

Is the Animatrix an anime? According to the Anime News Network encyclopedia, it is listed as an OAV. http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=1710 KyuuA4 10:20, 8 October 2006 (UTC)

Category: Studio 4°C[edit]

There is nothing in the body of the article to explain its inclusion in the category of Studio 4°C.

From IMDb: Studio 4°C (segments "Second Renaissance Part 1, The" "Second Renaissance Part 2, The", "Kid's Story", "Beyond" and "Detective Story") -Robixsmash (talk) 06:36, 9 December 2007 (UTC)

Text Criticism[edit]

The present version states that "The Animatrix is a collection of nine CG and anime shorts ...". Following the 'CG' link one learns that CG " ... was a French automobile maker"! So, what does 'CG' mean in the Animatrix context?


CG -> computer animation, problem solved, Fantasy ;-)

  • Actually cg=Computer graphics, with cgi special effects being Computer-generated imagery. Seeing as how the origional wording was "CG", I've changed the link to computer graphs. However, if you think computer animation works better, I have no objections to changing it back. All three articles appear to accredit themselves with their use in films and tv shows.


Some of these were on tv as well before Reloaded came out. I think it might have been MTV, I forget. Also, the 4 films that were "originally released on the series' official website" are still available ; I'm making a small note of it. --ScarletSpiderDave 07:14, 7 July 2006 (UTC)

Free downloads[edit]

The website won't allow me to download the four free preview videos of the animatrix from the website. The download and view options are there, but the download links just bring up the warner brothers website. Should that little note be removed? --Duckfootx 03:39, 12 April 2007 (UTC)

Very true, but the four free episodes are also preserved on FilePlanet in their previous high-quality resolution (640x272) in the QuickTime Movie (.mov) format. I was thinking that someone could put a link to that in the 'External Links' section of the article, or better yet, mention it in the 'Release' section as well. --Unsigned

Merge[edit]

The individual parts of this are not notable in any way, so they belong here in the article. They are easily short enough to cut any long summaries down by a bit. TTN (talk) 20:18, 11 September 2008 (UTC)

Matriculated - alternate interpretation[edit]

This is just based on my observation of the film, but wasn't the conclusion of Matriculated more inclined toward the converted machine being unable to distinguish the "real" world from a virtual environment? One of the characters mentions in a brief dialog that machines cannot discern fantasy from reality, and that all environments are the same to them. In the conclusion, the converted machine is shown witnessing the brutal slaughter of his new allies in the real world, and I think it concludes that the virtual reality it was earlier exposed to is the more desirable environment, so it plugs itself and the female protagonist back in. I think she then dies as a result of her injuries, and the machine is faced with the realization that each environment is co-dependent -- when the female suffers an injury and dies in the real world, she perishes from the virtual world as well.

In the ending sequence, we see the machine sitting at the shore in place of the female protagonist. I've been trying to interpret this as best as I can, but I think this is simply indicating that the machine sympathizes with the humans' cause, and wants to convert other machines in their place. 72.150.233.141 (talk) 02:19, 26 May 2009 (UTC)

Self-substantiation[edit]

The definition of self-substantiation given: "removing oneself from the Matrix without external aid" doesn't really seem correct. I think that self-substantiation means the ability to leave an "image" of oneself in the Matrix while having a body in the real world as well. This seems to make more sense, because it's like leaving the substance of oneself behind in the Matrix and it explains why there is a funeral at the end: there's still a body left behind.58.178.30.184 (talk) 04:47, 1 July 2009 (UTC)

You mean letting a bidy in the Matrix and letting the mind/soul/whateva go the the body in the real world, so that the Matrix-death won't become real as usual?--85.180.9.7 (talk) 13:04, 8 October 2010 (UTC)

Order?[edit]

The order of the plot summaries here is odd. It's not DVD order. It's not (according to the article) cinema order. It's almost alphabetical order, except "Final Flight of the Osiris" is near the end. Is there a particular order this was meant to be in? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.232.11.50 (talk) 07:11, 1 January 2011 (UTC)

Influences[edit]

DM: Let me maybe twist the question a little bit, to look less at the audience’s side and more towards the creator’s side. We’ve talked about this before. I know that when you were working on Cowboy Bebop, it was more of a domestic product, and it ended up going abroad. When you were working on Samurai Champloo, I think you knew very early on that this was going to be a global show. Maybe you can tell me a little bit about how creating one versus the other is different.
Dai Satō: A simple explanation would be this: A director named Shinichiro Watanabe created Animatrix after Cowboy Bebop. He said Cowboy Bebop gave him many ideas for Animatrix.

http://www.japansociety.org/otaku_unmasked --Gwern (contribs) 05:10 21 January 2012 (GMT)

The word 'animatrix'...[edit]

...itself has another meaning. It would mean "female animator" in Latin. Just a thought... --Arny (talk) 08:24, 9 June 2012 (UTC)