Talk:The Bostonians

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WikiProject Novels / 19th century (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
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Ambiguity[edit]

Editors may wish to reconsider what appear to be original research assumptions about ambiguity in the Themes section. James is not explicit... "partially due to the conventions of the time" is iffy, considering ambiguity is the hallmark of all James novels. It has nothing to do with the conventions of the time, and it is questionable that anyone familiar with his work would say that, so that sounds like pure OR. "But this vagueness may actually enrich the novel because it creates possible ambiguity about Olive's motives" goes on to make it clear that while the article author does understand the literary function of the ambiguity in this particular novel, they are not aware that it is James style and not unique to the novel. It would be much better IMO to quote and cite recognized James scholars. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.110.208.126 (talk) 18:32, 2 June 2013 (UTC)