The Fastest Guitar Alive

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The Fastest Guitar Alive
Fastest guitar alive.jpg
Directed by Michael D. Moore
Produced by Sam Katzman
Written by Robert E. Kent (screenplay)
Starring Roy Orbison
Sammy Jackson
Maggie Pierce
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release dates
  • September 1, 1967 (1967-09-01)
Running time 87 min.
Language English

The Fastest Guitar Alive is a 1967 MGM motion picture starring singer Roy Orbison in his only starring role as an actor. A musical western, the story is set near the end of the American Civil War with Orbison portraying a Southern spy with a bullet-shooting guitar given the task of robbing gold bullion from the United States Mint in San Francisco in order to help finance the Confederacy's war effort.

The film features Orbison performing seven original songs which appeared on his 1967 MGM record album of the same name.

Production[edit]

Primary cast[edit]


Soundtrack[edit]

The Fastest Guitar Alive
Soundtrack album by Roy Orbison
Released June 1967
Genre Rock and roll
Length 22:27
Label MGM (E 4475)
Producer Wesley Rose & Jim Vienneau
Roy Orbison chronology
Roy Orbison Sings Don Gibson
(1967)
The Fastest Guitar Alive
(1967)
Cry Softly Lonely One
(1967)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 2/5 stars [1]

The Fastest Guitar Alive is the soundtrack title for the 3313 record album from MGM Records released in June 1967. Its single "There Won't be Many Coming Home" reached #18 in the UK and entered the Australian chart at its highest position of #32 before slipping down the chart.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Roy Orbison and Bill Dees

Side one
  1. "Whirlwind"
  2. "Medicine Man, Medicine Man"
  3. "River"
  4. "The Fastest Guitar Alive"
  5. "Rollin' On"
Side two
  1. "Pistolero"
  2. "Good Time Party"
  3. "Heading South"
  4. "Best Friend"
  5. "There Won't Be Many Coming Home"

The track Rollin' On was covered on the 3313 record album Famous Western Film Melodies by the Prague Radio Dance Orchestra - ARTIA SUPRAPHON 1 13 1788.

References[edit]

External links[edit]