The Godfather Returns

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Godfather Returns
Author Mark Winegardner
Country United States
Language English
Series The Godfather
Genre Crime novel
Publisher Random House
Publication date
November 16, 2004
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback) & audio book
Pages 448 pp (Hardcover), 538 pp (Paperback)
ISBN 1-4000-6101-6
OCLC 56936487
813/.54 22
LC Class PS3573.I528 G64 2004b
Preceded by The Sicilian
Followed by The Godfather's Revenge

The Godfather Returns is a novel written by author Mark Winegardner, published in 2004. It is the sequel to Mario Puzo's The Godfather, which was originally published in 1969, and The Sicilian (1984). The publisher, Random House, selected Winegardner to write a sequel after Puzo's death. [1] As the original novel covered the years 1945 to 1955, and included significant back story on Don Vito Corleone's life, Returns covers the years 1955 to 1962, and includes significant back story on Michael Corleone's life prior to the first novel.

Plot[edit]

The story picks up immediately after the end of the first novel. The events of the film The Godfather Part II take place within the time frame of this novel, but are only mentioned in the background. Many of Puzo's characters are expanded upon, especially Fredo Corleone, Tom Hagen, and Johnny Fontane, and new characters like Nick Geraci, Danny Shea, and Francesca Corleone are introduced. The other half of the novel goes deeper into Michael's role as Don and his dream of legitimizing the Corleone family. The novel expands on Michael's service in World War II as well as his brother Fredo's secret life. The novel shows how Sonny, Fredo and Tom Hagen join the family business, as well as the deaths of Pete Clemenza and Sal Tessio.

The Godfather Returns was followed by The Godfather's Revenge in 2006, also written by Winegardner.

Reception[edit]

Michiko Kakutani, writing in the New York Times, called it "a solid enough performance: dutiful, suspenseful and only occasionally annoying." [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b KAKUTANI, MICHIKO (November 12, 2004). "You Think You're Out, but They Try to Pull You Back In". New York Times. Archived from the original on 2012-06-03. Retrieved 2012-06-03.