Tom Chorske

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Tom Chorske
Born (1966-09-18) September 18, 1966 (age 47)
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight 212 lb (96 kg; 15 st 2 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Canadiens
New Jersey Devils
Ottawa Senators
New York Islanders
Washington Capitals
Calgary Flames
Pittsburgh Penguins
NHL Draft 16th overall, 1985
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1989–2001

Thomas Patrick Chorske (born September 18, 1966) is an American retired professional ice hockey player. A forward, he played for eleven seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL). In September, 2006, he was named color commentator for New Jersey Devils radio broadcasts, a position he only held for one season before resigning. He was replaced with former team color commentator Sherry Ross (who called games from 1992–1995). Chorske returned to Minnesota and now works in business and is hockey analyst for Fox Sports North covering The NHL Minnesota Wild and University of Minnesota Golden Gopher NCAA hockey games.

Playing career[edit]

Following an outstanding high school hockey career at Minneapolis Southwest High School, Chorske was named Mr. Hockey as the state's most outstanding high school player 1985, the inaugural year for the award. Soon after, Tom was selected by the Montreal Canadiens 16th overall in the 1985 NHL Entry Draft.

After being drafted, Chorske played two seasons of NCAA hockey at the University of Minnesota followed by a year playing with the 1987–88 US National Team preparing for the Winter Olympics in Calgary. Unfortunately, Chorske was the last player cut from the team as they headed to Calgary for the Olympics. Tom returned to the University of Minnesota for the 1988–89 season and was instrumental in the team's success that year.

In 1989–90, Chorske played 14 games with the Montreal Canadiens, scoring three goals and an assist. After another season in Montreal, he joined the New Jersey Devils, playing 76 games in 1991–92, scoring 19 goals and 36 points. In 1993–94, he had his finest offensive year, scoring 21 goals and 41 points but it was the following season which was by far the most satisfying for Chorske, his teammates and fans of the Devils. After several years of being near the top of the NHL, the Devils finally put it all together in the spring of 1995, defeating the Detroit Red Wings in four straight games to claim the Stanley Cup.

In 1995–96, Chorske joined the Ottawa Senators where he played for two seasons and helped them make their first modern era playoff appearance in 1997. He then headed to New York to suit up for the Islanders where he scored 35 points, including 4 short-handed tallies. During the 1998–99 season, he was sent to the Washington Capitals but had abdominal surgery and was limited to 17 games before finally ending up in Calgary at the trade deadline. In 1999–2000, Chorske played 33 games with the Pittsburgh Penguins, his final stop in the NHL. In 2000–01, he appeared in 78 games for the Houston Aeros of the now defunct International Hockey League, scoring 27 goals and 52 points.

Chorske's NHL totals were 596 games, 115 goals, 122 assists, for 237 points. Overall, he played in 733 professional games before retiring. He also played an several Team USA World Championship teams, twice winning bronze medals.

Miscellaneous[edit]

  • Played quarterback for Minneapolis Southwest High School football team in 1984 and 1985.
  • Named to his high school all-conference first team in 1984–85.
  • Competed in 1985 U.S. National Sports Festival in Baton Rouge, La.
  • Played on first U.S. team to win a medal at World Junior Championships when he won bronze medal in 1986.
  • Competed in 1986 U.S. National Sports Festival in Houston.
  • Tied for Minnesota (WCHA) lead with 49 points and was All-WCHA First Team in 1988–89.
  • Left University of Minnesota after his junior year to pursue pro hockey career.
  • Was on Montreal team that joined Minnesota to compete in the 1990 NHL Friendship Tour in Soviet Union.
  • 1989–90: Played on AHL regular-season champions (Sherbrooke).
  • Played in Italy during 1994–95 NHL lockout.
  • Retired from hockey in 2002 and returned to University of Minnesota to complete his undergraduate degree.
  • Hired as a senior account executive in the St. Paul, MN, office of Merrill Corp.
  • Hired as analyst for Fox Sports North for Minnesota Gopher Hockey, October, 2010.

Awards and honors[edit]

Award Year
All-WCHA First Team 1988–89

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular Season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1985–86 University of Minnesota NCAA 39 6 4 10 16
1986–87 University of Minnesota NCAA 47 20 22 42 20
1988–89 University of Minnesota NCAA 37 25 24 49 28
1989–90 Sherbrooke Canadiens AHL 59 22 24 46 54 12 4 4 8 8
1989–90 Montreal Canadiens NHL 14 3 1 4 2
1990–91 Montreal Canadiens NHL 57 9 11 20 32
1991–92 New Jersey Devils NHL 76 19 17 36 32 7 0 3 3 4
1992–93 Utica Devils AHL 6 1 4 5 2
1992–93 New Jersey Devils NHL 50 7 12 19 25 1 0 0 0 0
1993–94 New Jersey Devils NHL 76 21 20 41 32 20 4 3 7 0
1994–95 New Jersey Devils NHL 42 10 8 18 16 17 1 5 6 4
1994–95 Milan Italy 7 11 5 16 6
1995–96 Ottawa Senators NHL 72 15 14 29 21
1996–97 Ottawa Senators NHL 68 18 8 26 16 5 0 1 1 2
1997–98 New York Islanders NHL 82 12 23 35 39
1998–99 New York Islanders NHL 2 0 1 1 2
1998–99 Washington Capitals NHL 17 0 2 2 4
1998–99 Calgary Flames NHL 7 0 0 0 2
1999–00 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 33 1 5 6 2
2000–01 Houston Aeros IHL 78 27 25 52 36 7 3 2 5 4
NHL totals 596 115 122 237 225 50 5 12 17 10
NCAA totals 123 51 50 101 64

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
José Charbonneau
Montreal Canadiens first round draft pick
1985
Succeeded by
Mark Pederson