Tomato bushy stunt virus

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Tomato bushy stunt virus
Virus classification
Group: Group IV ((+)ssRNA)
Order: Unassigned
Family: Tombusviridae
Genus: Tombusvirus
Species: Tomato bushy stunt virus

Tomato bushy stunt virus is a tombusvirus[1] first reported in tomatoes in 1935. Depending upon the host, TBSV causes stunting of growth, leaf mottling, and deformed or absent fruit. The virus is transmitted manually through the use of contaminated cutting tools. A wide variety of species are affected.

The virus is a spherical virus with a triangulation number of T = 3, hence it has 180 subunits of capsid protein. In 1978, its structure was determined by x-ray crystallography by Stephen C. Harrison.[2]

The genome of TBSV is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA of ~4800 nucleotides.[3] The virus encodes 5 genes, to express a replicase composed of two proteins (P33 and P92), a capsid protein (CP) of 42 kilodaltons, as well as p19 and P22. The P22 protein is primarily associated with cell to cell movement. The p19 protein is a pathogenicity factor and functions by suppressing the RNA silencing pathway. p19 binds viral derived short-interfering RNAs and prevents their incorporation into the RNA-induced Silencing Complex (RISC), thereby allowing viral propagation in the host plant. [4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mahy, Brian W. J.; Regenmortel, Marc H. V. Van (2009-10-15). Desk Encyclopedia of Plant and Fungal Virology. Academic Press. pp. 445–. ISBN 9780123751485. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  2. ^ Hellemans, Alexander; Bunch, Bryan H. (1988). The timetables of science: a chronology of the most important people and events in the history of science. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9780671621308. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  3. ^ Wagner, Edward K.; Hewlett, Martinez J.; Bloom, David C.; David Camerini (2007-11-06). Basic Virology. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 268–. ISBN 9781405147156. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  4. ^ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7491767