Tywyn Wharf railway station

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Tywyn Wharf
Edward Thomas at Tywyn Wharf - 2005-04-29.jpg
Location
Place Tywyn
Area Gwynedd
Coordinates 52°35′01″N 4°05′20″W / 52.583647°N 4.088783°W / 52.583647; -4.088783Coordinates: 52°35′01″N 4°05′20″W / 52.583647°N 4.088783°W / 52.583647; -4.088783
Grid reference SH586004
Operations
Managed by Talyllyn Railway
Owned by Talyllyn Railway
Platforms 1
History
1866 Opened (goods only)
Stations on heritage railways in the United Kingdom
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Tywyn Wharf station in 1905
Wharf station in 2008, showing the original slate loading wharf

Tywyn Wharf railway station is the western terminus and principal station of the Talyllyn Railway in Tywyn, Gwynedd in mid-Wales.

History[edit]

Originally called King's station after a local landowner, it was not a passenger station at first, but a place for transhipment of slates from the narrow gauge to the adjoining Cambrian Railway. Passenger trains started at the next station, Pendre.

Even after passenger services started running, the station had no run-round loop; shunting was carried out by propelling trains up the gradient out of the station and allowing them to run in under gravity. It was only after the line had been preserved in 1951 that a loop was finally provided.

As with all stations on the railway, there is only one platform, on the north side of the line, and the coaches have doors on that side only. This is due to tight clearances under the bridges. There are also sidings, a water tower and coaling stage. Llechfan, the hostel provided for volunteers on the railway, is a former private house on the opposite side of the line.

Station environment[edit]

As the line leaves the station it passes under a road bridge that carries the A493 Macyhynlleth to Dolgellau road. This bridge was rebuilt in 1955 by Merioneth County Council (as it was at the time), as it had become unsafe due to the heavier traffic passing over it. The council had argued that the Talyllyn, as builders and therefore owners of the bridge, should pay for repairs. However, the secretary of the society replied that the contribution towards repair would be "limited to the cost of putting the decking into a safe condition to carry the loads for which it was originally designed. If the council wishes the bridge to carry heavier loads than those envisaged in 1865 then it would have to be responsible for the additional strengthening required."[1]

Narrow Gauge Railway Museum[edit]

The Narrow Gauge Railway Museum was first built here in 1955 in a disused gunpowder store, housing some relics and locomotives that had been donated to the Talyllyn but for various reasons were not suitable for use. This was later moved into a separate building. Since then, the station building and museum have both been extended, culminating in the opening in 2005 of a brand new museum, shop and cafe by H.R.H. Prince Charles and The Duchess of Cornwall, following demolition of the previous museum building.

Layout[edit]

Layout of King's Station in 1865
Layout of Wharf station in 1964
Preceding station Heritage Railways  Heritage railways Following station
Terminus   Talyllyn Railway   Pendre

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Potter, David (1990). The Talyllyn Rail. David & Charles. ISBN 0-946537-50-X. 

Sources[edit]