Vern Huffman

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Vern Huffman
Vern Huffman.jpg
Huffman in his Indiana basketball uniform, circa 1936
Halfback, Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1914-12-18)December 18, 1914
Place of birth: Mooreland, Indiana
Date of death: March 18, 1995(1995-03-18) (aged 80)
Place of death: Bloomington, Indiana
Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) Weight: 215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school: New Castle High School
College: Indiana
NFL Draft: 1937 / Round: 3 / Pick: 27
Debuted in 1937 for the Detroit Lions
Last played in 1938 for the Detroit Lions
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 1938
Games played 22
Games started 15
Rushing attempts-yards 104-368
Receptions-yards 9-121
Touchdowns 2
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com
Stats at DatabaseFootball.com

Richard Vernon Huffman (December 18, 1914 – March 18, 1995) was an American football and basketball player. He was born in Mooreland, Indiana and was raised in and around New Castle, Indiana. He played basketball for the New Castle High School team that won the Indiana state basketball championship in 1932.[1] He enrolled at Indiana University in 1932 and played both football and basketball there. He was an All-American in both basketball and football at Indiana and won the 1936 Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the best football player in the Big Ten Conference.[1] He played two seasons of professional football in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions in 1937 and 1938.[2][3] Huffman later managed a dairy and worked for the Federal Bureau of Investigation.[4] He was inducted into the Indiana Hoosiers Hall of Fame in 1982.[5] Huffman died in 1995 at age 80 in Bloomington, Indiana.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "VERNON HUFFMAN, IU FOOTBALL STAR OF '30S, DIES AT AGE 80". News-Sentinel (Ft. Wayne, IN). 1995-03-20. 
  2. ^ "Vern Huffman profile". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2010-04-05. 
  3. ^ "Huffman Big Ten's 'Most Valuable'". The Pittsburgh Press. 1936-12-27. 
  4. ^ "Indiana University Oral History Archive, 1991-1998". Indiana University. Retrieved 2010-04-05. 
  5. ^ "Hall of Fame - 1982 Inductees". Indiana University.