Walton, Kansas

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Walton, Kansas
City
Walton City Hall in 2010
Walton City Hall in 2010
Location within Harvey County (top) and Kansas (bottom)
Location within Harvey County (top) and Kansas (bottom)
Coordinates: 38°7′3″N 97°15′23″W / 38.11750°N 97.25639°W / 38.11750; -97.25639Coordinates: 38°7′3″N 97°15′23″W / 38.11750°N 97.25639°W / 38.11750; -97.25639
Country United States
State Kansas
County Harvey
Platted 1876
Government
 • Type Mayor–Council
 • Mayor Evan Johnson [1]
 • City Clerk Janet Wentz [1]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.36 sq mi (0.93 km2)
 • Land 0.36 sq mi (0.93 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,532 ft (467 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 235
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 238
 • Density 650/sq mi (250/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67151
Area code 620
FIPS code 20-75200 [5]
GNIS feature ID 0478007 [6]
W i k i p e d i a

Walton is a city in Harvey County, Kansas, United States. It is named in honor of one of the stockholders of Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway.[7][8] The population was 235 for the 2010 census.[9]

History[edit]

Walton United Methodist Church in 2010. Dedicated on July 20, 1919.

Early history[edit]

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau. In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles.

19th century[edit]

1915 Railroad Map of Harvey County

In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre. In 1848, after the Mexican-American War, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo with Spain brought into the United States all or part of land for ten future states, including southwest Kansas. In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1872, Harvey County was established within the Kansas Territory, which included the land for modern day Walton.[10]

In 1871, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway extended a main line from Emporia through Walton to Newton.[11] In 1996, it merged with Burlington Northern Railroad and renamed to the current BNSF Railway. Most locals still refer to this railroad as the "Santa Fe".

Walton was laid out as a town site in December 1871 by William Mathews. The first buildings constructed were William Mathews house, general store, railroad section house. On account of there being some difficulty in obtaining a perfect title to the lots, the place remained dormant until J.F. Watson filed a plat of the town in 1876.[7] A post office was established in Walton on December 28, 1871.[12]

20th century[edit]

The New Santa Fe Trail road was routed through Walton in the late 1910s. Initially the road entered the north side of the city on Walton Ave.[13][14] The trail became U.S. Route 50 in the late 1930s when the new highway was routed northeast to southwest parallel to the railroad.

Geography[edit]

Walton is located at 38°7′3″N 97°15′23″W / 38.11750°N 97.25639°W / 38.11750; -97.25639 (38.117601, -97.256478).,[15] and being near the divide between Cottonwood and Arkansas Rivers and highest ground in Harvey County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.36 square miles (0.93 km2), all of it land.[2]

Area events[edit]

  • Walton Rural Life Festival, every October.[16][17]

Area attractions[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 225
1970 211 −6.2%
1980 269 27.5%
1990 226 −16.0%
2000 284 25.7%
2010 235 −17.3%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 235 people, 93 households, and 69 families residing in the city. The population density was 652.8 inhabitants per square mile (252.0/km2). There were 105 housing units at an average density of 291.7 per square mile (112.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.2% White, 0.4% African American, 5.1% Native American, 0.4% Asian, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.0% of the population.

There were 93 households of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 25.8% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the city was 40.9 years. 21.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.7% were from 25 to 44; 30.7% were from 45 to 64; and 17.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 57.0% male and 43.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 284 people, 109 households, and 79 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,162.6 people per square mile (456.9/km²). There were 118 housing units at an average density of 483.1 per square mile (189.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.42% White, 1.41% African American, 1.06% Native American, 1.06% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.87% of the population.

There were 109 households out of which 42.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.5% were non-families. 23.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.0% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 33.8% from 25 to 44, 16.9% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 129.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 114.4 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household was $34,375, and the median income for a family was $39,500. Males had a median income of $30,781 versus $18,882 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,679. About 9.1% of families and 11.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.5% of those under the age of eighteen and none of those sixty five or over.

Government[edit]

The Walton government consists of a mayor and five council members. The council meets the 1st Monday of each month at 7PM.[1]

  • City Hall, Police Department, Fire Department, 122 Main St.
  • US Post Office, 301 S 2nd Ave.

Education[edit]

Walton 21st Century Rural Life Center (Elementary) School in 2010.

Primary and secondary education[edit]

Walton is part of Unified School District 373.[19] Walton students of junior and high school ages attend school in Newton.

Library[edit]

Films[edit]

Using Agriculture to Spur Achievement : The Walton 21st Century Rural Life Center,[22] 2011, U.S. Department of Education filmed a documentary at the Walton 21st Century Rural Life Center charter elementary school in November 2010.[23] The crew also interviewed farm families, teachers, students, and community members. The resulting video will be featured on their website, highlighting the center as a best practices model of innovation in education.[24][25]

Media[edit]

Print[edit]

Radio[edit]

Walton is served by numerous radio stations of the Wichita-Hutchinson listening market area,[26] and satellite radio. See Media in Wichita, Kansas.

Television[edit]

Walton is served by over-the-air ATSC digital TV of the Wichita-Hutchinson viewing market area,[27] cable TV, and satellite TV. See Media in Wichita, Kansas.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

A major highway US-50 and a railroad BNSF Railway pass through Walton. US-50 was originally the New Santa Fe Trail and roughly parallels the BNSF Railway.

The Amtrak Southwest Chief stops in nearby Newton twice each day and provides passenger rail service towards Los Angeles and Chicago. See Newton (Amtrak station).

Utilities[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also List of people from Harvey County, Kansas

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Walton - Directory of Public Officials
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ a b History of the State of Kansas; William G Cutler; 1883
  8. ^ Harvey County Township History
  9. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  10. ^ The History of Marion County and Courthouse
  11. ^ Santa Fe Rail History
  12. ^ "Kansas Post Offices, 1828-1961 (archived)". Kansas Historical Society. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  13. ^ 1918 Kansas Highway Map; KSDOT.
  14. ^ 1932 Kansas Highway Map; KSDOT.
  15. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  16. ^ Walton Rural Life Festival; YouTube.com; August 2010.
  17. ^ Walton Rural Life Festival, The Newton Kansan, October 9, 2009
  18. ^ Kansas Historical Marker - Red Turkey Wheat
  19. ^ USD 373.
  20. ^ Walton Rural Life Center (Elementary School); USD 373.
  21. ^ Rural life fuels Kansas school’s revival; The Wichita-Eagle; December 26, 2012.
  22. ^ Using Agriculture to Spur Achievement : The Walton 21st Century Rural Life Center; U.S. Department of Education; YouTube.com; January 2011.
  23. ^ Walton School Focus Of U.S. Dept. Of Education Documentary; Craig Andres; KSN; November 9, 2010
  24. ^ Rural Kansas Charter School Featured In US Film; Amy Bickel; The Hutchinson News; November 10, 2010
  25. ^ National Crew Films At Walton Ag School; Cristina Janney; The Newton Kansan; November 18, 2010
  26. ^ Wichita-Hutchinson Radio market.
  27. ^ Wichita-Hutchinson TV market.
  28. ^ Kansas Legislators Past & Present

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps