Washington Initiative 692

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Initiative to the People 692
3 November 1998
Shall the medical use of marijuana for certain terminal or debilitating conditions be permitted and physicians authorized to advise patients about medical use of marijuana?
Results
Yes or no Votes Percentage
Yes check.svg Yes 1,121,851 58.97%
X mark.svg No 780,631 41.03%
Total votes 1,902,482 100.00%
Voter turnout 45.5%
Electorate 4,181,279
Results by county
Initiative 692 Results.png
  Yes
  No

Initiative 692 (I-692 or the Medical Use of Marijuana Act) was an initiative in the November 1998 election in the U.S. state of Washington. The initiative was to permit patients with certain debilitating conditions to use medical marijuana. Voters approved this initiative by 59%.[1]

Text of initiative[edit]

Ballot Title
Shall the medical use of marijuana for certain terminal or debilitating conditions be permitted and physicians authorized to advise patients about medical use of marijuana?

Yes [ ]
No  [ ]

Ballot Measure Summary
This measure would permit the medical use of marijuana by patients with certain terminal or debilitating conditions. Non-medical use of marijuana would still be prohibited. Physicians would be authorized to advise patients about the risks and benefits of the medical use of marijuana. Qualifying patients and their primary caregivers would be protected from prosecution if they possess marijuana solely for medical use by the patient. Certain additional restrictions and limitations are detailed in the measure.[2]

Election results[edit]

Initiative 692[3]
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 1,121,851 58.97
No 780,631 41.03
Total votes 1,902,482 100.00

In addition to passing statewide, the initiative also passed in every individual county in Washington state except the following: Adams, Cowlitz, Garfield, Grant, Klickitat, Lewis, Lincoln, Stevens, and Yakima.[3]

Campaign organization[edit]

The campaign to pass I-692 was funded by a California-based non-profit organization called Americans for Medical Rights. This group was funded by businessmen George Soros, John Sperling, and Peter Lewis.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Green, Sara Jean (October 3, 2008). "State rule clarifies 60-day supply of medical marijuana". The Seattle Times. The Seattle Times Company. Retrieved April 12, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Proposed Initiatives to the People - 1998". Secretary of State of Washington. 1998. Retrieved April 7, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Elections Search - Results November 1998 General". Secretary of State of Washington. November 1998. Retrieved April 7, 2010. 
  4. ^ Schaefer, David (November 4, 1998). "Initiative 692 -- States Back Medical Marijuana". The Seattle Times (The Seattle Times Company). Retrieved $1 $2.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)

External links[edit]