William Barribal

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William Henry Barribal
Born 1874
Died 1952 (1953) (aged 78)
Nationality British
Occupation Artist
Known for "The Smiling Huntsman"

William Henry Barribal (1874–1952) was a London artist who began his career as a lithographer before going on to study at the Académie Julian in Paris.[1]

By the turn of the 20th century, Barribal had become an accomplished painter and designer. He created a series of images that were used on First World War recruitment posters in Great Britain.[1][2] During the 1920s and 1930s he created a range of posters for the Schweppes advertising campaign[3] and in 1921 he was contracted to work for Waddingtons,[4] producing work that was used for posters and later a series of playing cards,[5][6] these works being keenly sought after today.[7] His bold Art Deco posters designed in 1920s and 1930s for the London and North Eastern Railway are also well known.[8] His wife, Gertrude Louisa Fannie Pitt, was his principal model and his work also included cigarette cards on which she appeared.

Barribal also worked for various magazines, including the leading fashion journal Vogue, and between 1919 and 1938 he regularly exhibited his work. His images of exquisite and fashionable Edwardian women have become classics and the work of many modern fashion artists shows traces of the unmistakable "Barribal style".

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gosling, Lucinda (2008). Brushes & Bayonets: Cartoons, Sketches & Paintings of World War I. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. p. 200. ISBN 9781846030956. 
  2. ^ Hynes, Samuel (199). A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture. London: Random House. p. 514. ISBN 9781446467923. 
  3. ^ Simmons, Douglas A. (1983). Schweppes® The First 200 Years. London: Springwood Books. ISBN 0-86254-104-2. 
  4. ^ Watson, Victor (2008). The Waddingtons Story: From the early days to Monopoly, the Maxwell bids and into the next Millennium. Northern Heritage Publications. p. 11. ISBN 1906600368. 
  5. ^ "Waddington’s "Barribal" Series, 1933". World of Playing Cards. Retrieved 30 April 2012. 
  6. ^ Presenter: Fiona Bruce, Producer: Michele Burgess, Series Editor: Simon Shaw. "Antiques Roadshow, Series 34, Episode 21, Yorkshire Museum 2". Antiques Roadshow. BBC. BBC One.
  7. ^ "Under the hammer; Personal Finance". Sunday Times (London, England): 7. 21 March 1993. Retrieved 26 November 2012. "PIN-UP of 1913 by William Barribal ... estimate £1,500" 
  8. ^ Beverley Cole; Richard Durack (1992). Railway Posters 1923-1947 (Paperback). London: Laurence King. p. 128. ISBN 1-85669-014-8. 

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