(131696) 2001 XT254

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(131696) 2001 XT254
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Sheppard, S. S., Kleyna, J., Jewitt, D. C.
Discovery date 9 December 2001
Designations
MPC designation (131696) 2001 XT254
SDO[2]
3:7 resonance[3][4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 4113 days (11.26 yr)
Aphelion 70.889 AU (10.6048 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 35.892 AU (5.3694 Tm) (q)
53.391 AU (7.9872 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.32774 (e)
390.13 yr (142494 d)
359.98° (M)
0° 0m 9.095s / day (n)
Inclination 0.51687° (i)
359.55° (Ω)
133.36° (ω)
Earth MOID 34.907 AU (5.2220 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 30.5705 AU (4.57328 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 146 km (assumed)[5]
0.09 (assumed)
7.4[1]

(131696) 2001 XT254, provisionally known as 2001 XT254, is a Kuiper belt object (KBO)[2] that has a 3:7 resonance with Neptune.[3]

It will come to perihelion in January 2016.[1]

Assuming a generic TNO albedo of 0.09, it is about 146 km in diameter.[5]

Resonance[edit]

Simulations by Emel’yanenko and Kiseleva in 2007 show that (131696) 2001 XT254 is librating in a 3:7 resonance with Neptune.[6] This libration can be stable for less than 100 million to billions of years.[6]

It has been observed 22 times over 4 oppositions.[1]

The trefoil libration of 2001 XT254. Jupiter in red, Saturn in yellow, and Uranus in blue. Neptune is the white dot at 5 o'clock.
The orbital period of 2001 XT254 around the 3:7 (2.333..) resonance of Neptune.

See also[edit]

(95625) 2002 GX32 has a similar resonant behavior.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 131696 (2001 XT254)" (2006-01-29 last obs). Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2009-01-30. 
  3. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 131696" (2013-03-24 using 28 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-01-30. 
  4. ^ "MPEC 2009-A63 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 JAN. 29.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center. 2009-01-13. Retrieved 2009-01-30. 
  5. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (22 August 2008). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-01-30. 
  6. ^ a b Emel’yanenko, V. V; Kiseleva, E. L. (2008). "Resonant motion of trans-Neptunian objects in high-eccentricity orbits". Astronomy Letters. 34 (4): 271–279. Bibcode:2008AstL...34..271E. doi:10.1134/S1063773708040075. 

External links[edit]