1,4-Cyclohexadiene

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1,4-Cyclohexadiene
1-4-cyclohexadiene.png
Names
IUPAC name
Cyclohexa-1,4-diene
Other names
1,4-Cyclohexadiene, 1,4-Dihydrobenzene, 1,4-CHDN, CHDN
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ECHA InfoCard 100.010.040
EC Number 211-043-1
Properties
C6H8
Molar mass 80.13 g/mol
Appearance Colourless liquid
Density 0.847 g/cm³
Melting point -49.2 °C
Boiling point 88 °C
Hazards
Highly flammable (F+), Toxic (T)
R-phrases (outdated) R11, R23/24/25, R36, R45, R48
S-phrases (outdated) S16, S27, S36/37/39, S45
NFPA 704
Flammability code 3: Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions. Flash point between 23 and 38 °C (73 and 100 °F). E.g., gasolineHealth code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroformReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
3
2
0
Flash point -6 °C
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

1,4-Cyclohexadiene is a highly flammable cycloalkene that occurs as a colorless clear liquid.

1,4-Cyclohexadiene and related compounds may be prepared from benzene using lithium or sodium in liquid ammonia, this process being known as a Birch reduction. However 1,4-cyclohexadiene is easily oxidised to benzene, the driving force being the formation of an aromatic ring. The conversion to an aromatic system may be performed in the laboratory using an alkene such as styrene, along with a hydrogen transfer agent such as palladium metal supported on charcoal.

γ-Terpinene is a naturally occurring derivative of 1,4-cyclohexadiene, found in the essential oils of coriander, lemon, and cumin.

References


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