1069 Planckia

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1069 Planckia
Discovery
Discovered by Maximilian Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf
Discovery date 28 January 1927
Designations
MPC designation (1069) Planckia
Named after
Max Planck
1927 BC
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 89.22 yr (32588 days)
Aphelion|Aphelion 3.47724 AU (520.188 Gm)
Perihelion|Perihelion 2.7821069 AU (416.19727 Gm)
3.12967 AU (468.192 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.111055
5.54 yr (2022.3 d)
4.672880°
0° 10m 40.853s / day
Inclination 13.5658957°
142.4264733°
32.2490615°
Earth MOID 1.79791 AU (268.964 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.54307 AU (230.840 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.161
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
19.75±1.05 km
8.665 h (0.3610 d)
0.2158±0.025
9.4

1069 Planckia is a main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Max Wolf on January 28, 1927, and assigned a provisional designation of 1927 BC. It was named after physicist Max Planck.[2]

Photometric measurements made in 2000, when combined with earlier observations, showed a light curve with a period of 8.643 ± 0.05 hours.[3] As of 2013, the estimate for the rotation period is 8.665 hours.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1069 Planckia (1927 BC)", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Schmadel, Lutz (1992). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names, Volym 1. Berlin: Springer Verlag. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  3. ^ Warner, B. D.; Malcolm, G.; Stephens, R. D. (December 2001), "The Lightcurve of 1069 Planckia Revisited", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 28, pp. 71–72, Bibcode:2001MPBu...28...71W. 

External links[edit]