1252 Celestia

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1252 Celestia
Discovery [2]
Discovered by F. L. Whipple
Discovery site Oak Ridge Obs.[1] (Harvard)
Discovery date 19 February 1933
Designations
MPC designation 1252 Celestia
Named after
Celestia Whipple (mother)[3]
1933 DG · 1934 PA1
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 82.95 yr (30297 days)
Aphelion 3.2536 AU (486.73 Gm)
Perihelion 2.1345 AU (319.32 Gm)
2.6940 AU (403.02 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.20769
4.42 yr (1615.1 d)
274.17°
0° 13m 22.404s / day
Inclination 33.844°
140.93°
63.675°
Earth MOID 1.2739 AU (190.57 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.07743 AU (310.779 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.101
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 17.4 km
Mean radius
8.695±0.8 km
10.636 h (0.4432 d)
0.2573±0.053
B–V = 0.890
U–B = 0.425
S (Tholen), S (SMASS)
10.89

1252 Celestia, provisional designation 1933 DG, is a stony main-belt asteroid discovered on February 19, 1933, by American astronomer Fred Whipple at Oak Ridge Observatory[1] operated by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics at Massachusetts, United States. The S-type asteroid measures about 17 kilometers in diameter, rotates once every 10.6 hours and is heavily tilted towards the ecliptic by almost 34 degrees.[2]

It was named after the mother of the discoverer, Celestia MacFarland Whipple.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved October 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1252 Celestia (1933 DG)" (2015-09-06 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 28 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1252) Celestia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 104. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved October 2015. 

External links[edit]