1554 Yugoslavia

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1554 Yugoslavia
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. B. Protitch
Discovery site Belgrade Obs.
Discovery date 6 September 1940
Designations
MPC designation (1554) Yugoslavia
Named after
Yugoslavia
(country, 20th century)[2]
1940 RE · 1932 YA
1935 JN · 1936 UH
1948 MH
main-belt · Eunomia[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 83.87 yr (30,632 days)
Aphelion 3.1486 AU
Perihelion 2.0891 AU
2.6189 AU
Eccentricity 0.2023
4.24 yr (1,548 days)
15.644°
0° 13m 57.36s / day
Inclination 12.151°
217.12°
131.63°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 14.73±1.13 km[4]
15.94 km (calculated)[3]
16.185±0.107 km[5]
17.198±0.160 km[6]
21.39±1.31 km[7]
3.8876±0.0001 h[8]
3.8879±0.0003 h[9]
3.89±0.01 h[10]
0.070±0.009[7]
0.1043±0.0145[6]
0.117±0.026[5]
0.21 (assumed)[3]
0.269±0.048[4]
S[3]
11.20[4] · 11.3[1][3] · 11.9[7][6]

1554 Yugoslavia, provisional designation 1940 RE, is a stony Eunomian asteroid from the middle region of the asteroid belt, approximately 16 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Serbian astronomer Milorad Protić at Belgrade Astronomical Observatory, Serbia, on 6 September 1940.[11] It was named for the former country of Yugoslavia.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

The asteroid is a member of the Eunomia family, a large group of mostly stony S-type asteroids and the most prominent family in the intermediate main-belt. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.1–3.1 AU once every 4 years and 3 months (1,548 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.20 and an inclination of 12° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Yugoslavia was first identified as 1932 YA at Uccle Observatory in 1932. Its observation arc begins 4 year prior to its official discovery observation, with a precovery taken at Nice Observatory in 1936.[11]

Physical characteristics[edit]

From 2007 to 2012, several photometric lightcurve observations of Yugoslavia established a well-defined rotation period of 3.89 hours with a brightness variation between 0.64 and 0.74 magnitude (U=3/3/3).[8][9][10]

According to the surveys carried out by the Japanese Akari satellite and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Yugoslavia measures between 14.73 and 21.39 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo between 0.070 and 0.269.[4][5][6][7] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.21 – derived from 15 Eunomia, the family's largest member and namesake – and calculates a diameter of 15.94 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 11.3.[3]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after the former country of Yugoslavia.[2] Naming citation was published before November 1977 (M.P.C. 2277).[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1554 Yugoslavia (1940 RE)" (2016-11-04 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1554) Yugoslavia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 123. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (1554) Yugoslavia". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Nugent, C.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey" (PDF). Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Benishek, Vladimir (April 2013). "Lightcurves for 366 Vincentina, 592 Bathseba, and 1544 Yugoslavia from Belgrade Astronomical Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (2): 100–101. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40..100B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Higgins, David (March 2008). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Hunters Hill Observatory and Collaborating Stations: April 2007 - June 2007". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (1): 30–32. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...30H. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Ruthroff, John C. (April 2013). "Lightcurve Analysis of Main Belt Asteroids 1115 Sabauda 1554 Yugoslavia, 1616 Filipoff, 2890 Vilyujsk, (5153) 1940 GO, and (31179) 1997 YR2". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 40 (2): 90–91. Bibcode:2013MPBu...40...90R. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b "1554 Yugoslavia (1940 RE)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 30 December 2016. 

External links[edit]