155 Scylla

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155 Scylla
Discovery[1]
Discovered by J. Palisa
Discovery date 8 November 1875
Designations
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 140.43 yr (51293 d)
Aphelion 3.5210 AU (526.73 Gm)
Perihelion 1.99069 AU (297.803 Gm)
2.75584 AU (412.268 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.27764
4.57 yr (1671.0 d)
17.59 km/s
233.652°
0° 12m 55.584s / day
Inclination 11.388°
41.000°
45.887°
Earth MOID 1.02278 AU (153.006 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.85934 AU (278.153 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.259
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 39.9 km
Mass 1.3×1017 kg
Mean density
2.0 g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0138 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0262 km/s
7.9597 h (0.33165 d)[3][4]
0.0309±0.007
Temperature ~168 K
11.39

155 Scylla is a main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Austrian astronomer J. Palisa on November 8, 1875, and named after the monster Scylla in Greek mythology. Two weeks after its discovery this asteroid became lost and was not recovered for 95 years. It was finally found by Paul Wild of Berne, Switzerland with the aid of an ephemeris created in 1970 by Conrad M. Bardwell at Cincinnati Observatory.[5]

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2008 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico, gave an asymmetrical, bimodal light curve with a period of 7.9597 ± 0.0001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.46 ± 0.03 in magnitude.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". astorb. Lowell Observatory. 
  3. ^ a b Yeomans, Donald K., "155 Scylla", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick; Jardine, Don (April 2009), "Period Determinations for 31 Euphrosyne, 35 Leukothea 56 Melete, 137 Meliboea, 155 Scylla, and 264 Libussa", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 36 (2): 52–54, Bibcode:2009MPBu...36...52P 
  5. ^ Hodgson, Richard G. (September 1976), "155 Scylla, 279 Thule, 944 Hidalgo, and 1620 Geographos: Four Challenges for Observation", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 4, p. 7, Bibcode:1976MPBu....4....7H. 

External links[edit]