1815 Beethoven

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1815 Beethoven
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 27 January 1932
Designations
MPC designation (1815) Beethoven
Named after
Ludwig van Beethoven
(German composer)[2]
1932 CE1 · 1938 EP
1952 SO · 1954 BD
1958 TJ · 1969 UY1
1971 BN1
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 85.26 yr (31,143 days)
Aphelion 3.7544 AU
Perihelion 2.5603 AU
3.1573 AU
Eccentricity 0.1891
5.61 yr (2,049 days)
100.61°
0° 10m 32.52s / day
Inclination 2.7380°
110.84°
358.78°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 30.598±0.168[3]
54 h (2.3 d)[1]
0.0548 ± 0.009
0.057±0.013[3]
Tholen = F[1]
B–V = 0.617[1]
U–B 0.330[1]
11.36[1]

1815 Beethoven, provisional designation 1932 CE1, is a rare-type carbonaceous asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 30 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 27 January 1932, by German astronomer Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany.

In the Tholen classification, Beethoven belongs to the relatively rare group of dark F-type asteroid.[1][3] A rotational lightcurve, obtained by American astronomer Robert Stephens in 2005, gave a rotation period of 54 ± 1 hours, which is a relatively slow spin rate compared to most other asteroids.[4]

This minor planet is named after German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827).[2][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1815 Beethoven (1932 CE1)" (2017-05-03 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1815) Beethoven. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 145. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. arXiv:1406.6645Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 14 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Stephens, Robert D. (September 2005). "Asteroid lightcurve photometry from Santana Observatory - winter 2005". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (3): 66–68. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...66S. 
  5. ^ Ash, Russell (10 November 2011). Boring, Botty and Spong. RHCP. p. 18. ISBN 978-1-4090-9739-6. 

External links[edit]