1815 Beethoven

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1815 Beethoven
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Reinmuth
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 27 January 1932
Designations
MPC designation 1815 Beethoven
Named after
Ludwig van Beethoven[2]
1932 CE1 · 1938 EP
1952 SO · 1954 BD
1958 TJ · 1969 UY1
1971 BN1
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 84.15 yr (30734 days)
Aphelion 3.7464 AU (560.45 Gm)
Perihelion 2.5645 AU (383.64 Gm)
3.1555 AU (472.06 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18727
5.61 yr (2047.3 d)
355.24°
0° 10m 33.024s / day
Inclination 2.7382°
110.94°
358.78°
Earth MOID 1.58108 AU (236.526 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.39226 AU (208.279 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.177
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 30.36 km
Mean radius
15.18 ± 1.1 km
54 h (2.3 d)
0.0548 ± 0.009
BV = 0.617 mag
UB = 0.330 mag
Tholen = F
11.36

1815 Beethoven, provisional designation 1932 CE1, is a main-belt asteroid discovered on January 27, 1932, by Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg Observatory. It measures about 30 kilometers in diameter and belongs to the relatively rare group of F-type asteroids.

The light curve of this minor planet has a period of 54 ± 1 hours.[3]

It is named after German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827).[2][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1815 Beethoven (1932 CE1)" (2015-02-06 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 20 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1815) Beethoven. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 145. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ Stephens, Robert D. (September 2005). "Asteroid lightcurve photometry from Santana Observatory - winter 2005". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (3): 66–68. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...66S. 
  4. ^ Ash, Russell (10 November 2011). Boring, Botty and Spong. RHCP. p. 18. ISBN 978-1-4090-9739-6. 

External links[edit]