1916 Boreas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1916 Boreas
Discovery [1]
Discovered by S. Arend
Discovery site Uccle – Belgium
Discovery date 1 September 1953
Designations
MPC designation 1916 Boreas
Named after
Boreas
(Greek mythology)[2]
1953 RA
NEO · Amor
Orbital characteristics[1][3]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 62.45 yr (22809 days)
Aphelion 3.2945 AU (492.85 Gm)
Perihelion 1.2490 AU (186.85 Gm)
2.2717 AU (339.84 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.45021
3.42 yr (1250.6 d)
79.358°
0° 17m 16.26s / day
Inclination 12.889°
340.64°
335.88°
Earth MOID 0.248946 AU (37.2418 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.05931 AU (308.068 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.441
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 3.5 km[1]
3.07 km (calculated)[4]
Mean radius
1.75 km
3.49 h[5]
3.4746 h (0.14478 d)[1][6]
3.4741±0.0003 h[a]
3.4748±0.0010 h[a]
0.20 (assumed)[4]
B–V = 0.852
U–B = 0.407
S (Tholen), S (SMASS)
S[4]
14.93[1]

1916 Boreas, provisional designation 1953 RA, is an eccentric, stony Amor asteroid discovered on 1 September 1953, by Belgian astronomer Sylvain Arend at the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Uccle.[7] The asteroid was observed for 2 months and then with time became a lost asteroid. It was recovered in 1974 by Richard Eugene McCrosky, G. Schwartz and JH Bulger based on a predicted position by Brian G. Marsden.[b][8]

The near-Earth asteroid measures about 3 to 4 kilometers in diameter. It has an Earth minimum orbit intersection distance of 0.25 AU. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.2–3.3 AU once every 3 years and 5 months (1,251 days). Its orbit shows a high eccentricity of 0.45 and a orbital inclination of 13 degrees towards the plane of the ecliptic. It takes 3.5 hours[a] to rotate once around its axis and has an albedo of 0.20, as assumed by the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link.[4] Its stony composition (S-type) is one of the most common ones among asteroids.

The minor planet is named after the Greek god of the north wind, Boreas, as the asteroid was discovered moving rapidly northward after passing the ascending node of its orbit.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1916 Boreas (1953 RA)" (2015-11-22 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1916) Boreas. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 154. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 1 October 2015. 
  3. ^ "(1916) Boreas". AstDyS. University of Pisa. Retrieved December 20, 2008. 
  4. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (1916) Boreas". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 1 December 2015. 
  5. ^ Robinson, L. E. (June 2002). "Lightcurve Photometry of 551 Ortrud, 1118 Hanskya, and 1916 Boreas from Sunflower Observatory". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 29: 37–38. Bibcode:2002MPBu...29...37R. Retrieved 1 December 2015. 
  6. ^ Krugly, Yu. N.; Belskaya, I. N.; Chiorny, V. G.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Gaftonyuk, N. M. (November 2002). "CCD photometry of near-Earth asteroids in 2001". In: Proceedings of Asteroids: 903–906. Bibcode:2002ESASP.500..903K. Retrieved 1 December 2015. 
  7. ^ "1916 Boreas (1953 RA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 1 December 2015. 
  8. ^ Brian G. Marsden (October 24, 1974). "International Astronomical Union Circular 2710". Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. Retrieved 2011-07-05. 
  1. ^ a b c Pravec (2001) web: rotation period 3.4748±0.0010 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.28 mag. Behrend (2001) web: rotation period 3.4741±0.0003 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.29 mag. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (1916) Boreas
  2. ^ Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams – 1953 RA This member of the Amor group, not observed since 1953 (cf. Minor Planet Circ. No. 3015), has been recovered by McCrosky, Schwartz and Bulger with the 155-cm reflector some 0o.3 from an unpublished prediction by B. G. MarsdenInternational Astronomical Union Circular 2710 for (1953 RA)

External links[edit]