1971 Florida Gators football team

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1971 Florida Gators football
Conference Southeastern Conference
1971 record 4–7 (1–6 SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey (2nd season)
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn (2nd season)
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts (2nd season)
Captain Harvin Clark
Tommy Durrance
John Reaves
Home stadium Florida Field
(Capacity: 61,200)[1]
Seasons
← 1970
1972 →
1971 SEC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 4 Alabama $ 7 0 0     11 1 0
No. 7 Georgia 5 1 0     11 1 0
No. 12 Auburn 5 1 0     9 2 0
No. 15 Ole Miss 4 2 0     10 2 0
No. 9 Tennessee 4 2 0     10 2 0
No. 11 LSU 3 2 0     9 3 0
Vanderbilt 1 5 0     4 6 1
Florida 1 6 0     4 7 0
Kentucky 1 6 0     3 8 0
Mississippi State 1 7 0     2 9 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1971 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida during the 1971 college football season. The season was Doug Dickey's second as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1971 Florida Gators finished with a 4–7 overall record and a 1–6 record in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), tying for eighth among ten SEC teams.[2]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 11 Duke* Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida L 6–12   51,477
September 18 Mississippi State Mississippi Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi L 10–13   33,500
September 25 No. 8 Alabama Florida FieldGainesville, Florida L 0–38   61,832
October 2 No. 12 Tennessee Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 13–20   61,112
October 9 No. 16 LSU Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana L 7–48   67,055
October 16 No. 19 Florida State* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 17–15   65,109
October 23 Maryland*dagger Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 27–23   53,021
October 30 No. 5 Auburn Cliff Hare StadiumAuburn, Alabama L 7–40   63,500
November 6 No. 7 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida L 7–49   67,383
November 13 Kentucky Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 35–24   45,268
November 27 Miami (FL)* Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, Florida W 45–16   37,710
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

Primary source: 2015 Florida Gators Football Media Guide[2]

Attendance figures: 1972 University of Florida Football Brochure.[3]

Game summaries[edit]

Duke[edit]

1 234Total
Duke 6 303 12
Florida 0 060 6

[4]

Mississippi State[edit]

1 234Total
Florida 0 1000 10
Mississippi State 3 073 13

[5]

Alabama[edit]

1 234Total
#8 Alabama 10 1477 38
Florida 0 000 0
  • Date: September 25
  • Location: Florida Field
    Gainesville, Florida
  • Game attendance: 61,832

Against the Gators, Alabama's Johnny Musso scored four rushing touchdowns en route to a 38–0 shutout at Florida Field.[6][7] After Bill Davis gave the Crimson Tide a 3–0 lead with his first quarter field goal, Musso scored Alabama's next four touchdowns and extended their lead to 31–0.[6][7] All four came on the ground with a pair from one-yard out, a three-yard run and a five-yard run.[6][7] Alabama then closed the game with an 11-yard Billy Sexton touchdown pass to Dexter Wood that made the final score 38–0.[6][7]

The four touchdowns scored by Musso on the ground set a new school record for rushing touchdowns. Additionally, the shutout was the first for the Crimson Tide defense since their 17–0 victory in 1967 over South Carolina.[7]

Tennessee[edit]

1 234Total
Tennessee 3 1070 20
Florida 0 1300 13

[8]

LSU[edit]

Florida State[edit]

1 234Total
Florida State 0 0015 15
Florida 0 1403 17

The Gators beat the Seminoles 17–15.[9]

Maryland[edit]

1 234Total
Maryland 0 13100 23
Florida 7 677 27

[10]

Auburn[edit]

1 234Total
Florida 0 700 7
Auburn 12 0721 40

[11]

Georgia[edit]

1 234Total
Georgia 7 13227 49
Florida 0 700 7

[12]

Kentucky[edit]

1 234Total
Kentucky 0 3714 24
Florida 0 7721 35

[13]

Miami (FL)[edit]

The disappointing season ended on a controversial note. With the Gators leading the Miami Hurricanes 45–8 late in the fourth quarter of the last game of the season, senior quarterback John Reaves was just 14 yards short of the NCAA career record for passing yardage, but Miami had the ball and seemed destined to run out the clock. At the urging of Florida defensive captain Harvin Clark, Dickey agreed to permit the Gators defense to allow the Hurricanes to score, thus returning the ball to the Gators offense and giving Reaves a chance to break the record. Dubbed the "Florida Flop" or "Gator Flop", the move worked. When Miami snapped the ball from the Florida 8-yard line, the Gators instantly flopped to the turf, allowing Miami quarterback John Hornibrook to walk uncontested into the endzone. Florida's offense got one more possession, and Reeves promptly broke the record with a pass to favorite target Carlos Alvarez. After the game, many Gator players celebrated by jumping into the pool at the Orange Bowl's east end zone used by the Miami Dolphins' live mascot, Flipper.

Miami coach Fran Curci was so angered by the turn of events that he refused to shake Dickey's hand. In a post-game interview, he called the actions "bush league" and declared that "what Doug Dickey did shows absolutely no class."[14][15][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sports Publicity Department. "1971 University of Florida Football Brochure" (PDF). floridagators.com. University Athletic Association, Inc. Retrieved 15 March 2018. 
  2. ^ a b 2015 Florida Gators Football Media Guide Archived 2015-12-08 at the Wayback Machine., University Athletic Association, Gainesville, Florida, p. 107 (2015). Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  3. ^ Sports Publicity Department. "1972 University of Florida Football Brochure" (PDF). floridagators.com. University Athletic Association, Inc. Retrieved 15 March 2018. 
  4. ^ "Duke Boots Top Gators." Ocala Star-Banner. 1971 Sept 12.
  5. ^ Ocala Star-Banner. 1971 September 19.
  6. ^ a b c d e Reed, Delbert (September 26, 1971). "High Tide in Florida". The Tuscaloosa News. Google News Archives. p. 1B. Retrieved January 30, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f Tucker, Tommy (September 26, 1971). "Musso leads Alabama romp by hapless Florida, 38–0". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Google News Archives. p. 1C. Retrieved January 30, 2014. 
  8. ^ Ocala Star-Banner. 1971 Oct. 3.
  9. ^ "Florida State Football - 1971 Year In Review". nolefan.org. Retrieved 23 January 2016. 
  10. ^ Palm Beach Post. 1971 Oct. 24.
  11. ^ Palm Beach Post. 1971 Oct 31.
  12. ^ Ocala Star-Banner. 1971 Nov 7.
  13. ^ Ocala Star-Banner. 1971 Nov 14.
  14. ^ Paul Lukas, "The stories behind the 1971 Gator Flop", ESPN.com (September 16, 2010). Retrieved March 9, 2012.
  15. ^ Randall Mell, "It was humiliating", Orlando Sun-Sentinel (December 20, 2000). Retrieved March 30, 2014.
  16. ^ "Contemporary TV coverage of Florida Flop (youtube)". Retrieved March 30, 2014.