1988 WAFL season

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1988 WAFL season
Teams 8
Premiers Subiaco
(7th premiership)
Minor premiers Claremont
(7th minor premiership)
Matches played 88
Bernie Naylor Medallist Todd Breman (Subiaco)
Sandover Medal David Bain (East Perth)
1987
1989

The 1988 WAFL season was the 104th season of the West Australian Football League in its various incarnations.

In many ways the “end of an era”, the 1988 season saw the membership base of most WAFL clubs severely affected by the transfer of the State’s best players to the West Coast, a problem only marginally ameliorated by reciprocal memberships given to many Eagle members.[1] The WAFL was laced with several off-field controversies, with chief executive Peter Cumminsky refusing to allow an exhibition match in Vancouver which Subiaco and Swan Districts planned to play on the last Saturday in September,[2] and opposing the WAFC over an Eagles reserves team and maximum transfer fees to VFL clubs being set $13,000 lower than what the clubs said was needed to actually develop the highest standard footballers – in effect funding “destitute” VFL clubs.[3]

The season also saw the end of the exceptionally high scoring of the past decade: for the first time since 1977 the WA(N)FL did not see a single score of over 200 points or a match where both teams scored twenty goals, while the highest score of 27.20 (182) was the lowest since 1974. The average score of 103.97 points per team per game was the lowest since 1975.

Claremont and Subiaco continued to dominate the WAFL this year under coaches Gerard Neesham and Haydn Bunton Jr. (who in 1987 was rumoured to be going to Fitzroy as a replacement for David Parkin) but this time the Lions took the honours with their second convincing Grand Final win in three seasons. There was controversy because the Lions played Laurie Keene after the WAFL ruled on 7 September that a VFL match against Melbourne on the Queen’s Birthday, for which Keene travelled to Melbourne an emergency, counted as a WAFL game to determine eligibility for finals.[4] Early-1980s power club Swan Districts, who lost champion coach John Todd to the Eagles and suffered the first of numerous financial crises in the subsequent fifteen years,[5] became the first club since the colts competition began in 1957 to suffer the ignominy of finishing last in all three grades,[6][7][a] although expectations the black and whites would suffer another lengthy period in the cellar were not fulfilled in subsequent seasons. South Fremantle, who had lost their last eighteen matches of 1987, convincingly won the WAFL’s pre-season competition[8] and despite a second consecutive injury crisis with twenty-four senior list players unavailable as of Round 12,[9] rebounded for their first finals appearance in five seasons due to the return of Maurice Rioli and the discovery of numerous young stars like Peter Sumich, Scott Watters and Stevan Jackson.

Home-and-away season[edit]

Round 1 (Easter Monday)[edit]

Round 1
Monday, 4 April West Perth 23.23 (161) def. Swan Districts 10.17 (77) Leederville Oval (crowd: 6700)
Monday, 4 April South Fremantle 21.23 (149) def. East Perth 6.12 (48) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6800)
Monday, 4 April Claremont 21.16 (142) def. Subiaco 11.9 (75) Claremont Oval (crowd: 5700) [10]
Monday, 4 April Perth 13.20 (98) def. by East Fremantle 17.15 (117) WACA (crowd: 4500)
  • Despite 32 °C (89.6 °F) heat, the WAFL is at delighted the experiment of playing the full opening round on Easter Monday, with attendances up 8,600 on the first round of 1987.[11]
  • The return of Rioli, the recruitment of Willie Roe from the Royals and Magro’s improvement in South’s fitness gives the Bulldogs a big win over a disappointing East Perth.[12]
  • Eagle discard Sean King shows the VFL newcomers may have made an error as he dominates from the wing over a Swan Districts team still becoming accustomed to new coach Blackaby.[13]

Round 2[edit]

Round 2
Saturday, 9 April Swan Districts 17.23 (125) def. South Fremantle 14.11 (95) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4383)
Saturday, 9 April Subiaco 14.15 (99) def. East Perth 10.10 (70) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3011) [14]
Saturday, 9 April Claremont 8.18 (66) def. by Perth 10.14 (74) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3315)
Saturday, 9 April East Fremantle 14.19 (103) def. West Perth 14.9 (93) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4388) [15]
  • South Fremantle’s lack of depth that produced a horror 1987 seems to rear its ugly head again as Bulldog team minus Rioli, Sumich, Wally Matera, Tony Amoroso, Graham Kickett and John McDonald provides Blackaby a first victory despite the loss of key ruckman Allan Sidebottom to a serious injury.[8]
  • Perth end Claremont’s 22-game unbeaten streak as Wiley’s plan of hard pressure drives most Tiger shots off-line and Claremont do not obtain enough play to counter this.[16]

Round 3[edit]

Round 3
Saturday, 16 April Subiaco 26.18 (174) def. Swan Districts 9.11 (65) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4002)
Saturday, 16 April West Perth 8.16 (64) def. by Perth 18.9 (117) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4361) [17]
Saturday, 16 April East Perth 10.10 (70) def. by Claremont 21.23 (149) WACA (crowd: 2744) [18]
Saturday, 16 April East Fremantle 11.19 (85) def. South Fremantle 10.12 (72) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 7764) [19]
  • Shane Cocker and Laurie Keene decimate Swan Districts with their height,[20] whilst the Swans suffer from a “mixed-up” report to wingman Geoff Passeri – reported for striking a different player from the one witness knew he struck and ultimately having his charge dismissed on grounds of insufficient evidence.[21]
  • The result was Subiaco’s biggest win over Swans until 1998, beating 100 points two seasons before.[22]

Round 4 (Anzac Day)[edit]

Round 4
Sunday, 24 April East Fremantle 8.12 (60) def. by Subiaco 15.19 (109) Geraldton (crowd: 3420) [23]
Monday, 25 April Swan Districts 16.16 (112) def. East Perth 14.12 (96) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4300) [24]
Monday, 25 April Perth 24.22 (166) def. South Fremantle 16.13 (109) WACA (crowd: 9000) [25]
Monday, 25 April West Perth 20.13 (133) def. Claremont 16.7 (103) WACA (crowd: 9000)
  • The two Anzac Day games at the WACA were played as a double-header for the first time in WAFL history.
  • Perth lead by 94 points at three-quarter time as Bulldog discard Dempsey Narkle dominates in the ruck and appear likely to pass their highest score from 1977, but kick only 1.5 (11) to 7.6 (48) in the last quarter[26]

Round 5[edit]

Round 5
Saturday, 30 April South Fremantle 16.26 (122) def. West Perth 6.13 (49) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3842)
Saturday, 30 April Subiaco 23.10 (148) def. Perth 15.15 (105) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 5015)
Saturday, 30 April Claremont 18.19 (127) def. Swan Districts 13.11 (89) Claremont Oval (crowd: 2873)
Saturday, 30 April East Perth 16.9 (105) def. by East Fremantle 17.23 (125) WACA (crowd: 2210) [27]
  • The power of Brad McDougall (eight goals), plus Breman and John Georgiades (five apiece) along with future dual Sandover winner Ian Dargie’s tackling and smothering in the thick of the action ensures Subiaco end Perth’s honeymoon in convincing style.[28]
  • Despite losing Rioli in an opening exchange, South Fremantle rebound from three losses to thrash a “pathetic” West Perth, as Craig Edwards moves into the ruck and the returning Merv Dellar forms part of a rampant mosquito fleet.[29]

Round 6[edit]

Round 6
Saturday, 7 May West Perth 12.15 (87) def. by Subiaco 20.12 (132) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4679)
Saturday, 7 May Perth 20.20 (140) def. East Perth 15.6 (96) WACA (crowd: 3102)
Saturday, 7 May South Fremantle 14.17 (101) def. by Claremont 18.19 (127) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 5159)
Saturday, 7 May Swan Districts 15.18 (108) def. by East Fremantle 22.19 (151) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 4388) [30]
  • Four goals each from Don Pyke and debutant Billy Krakouer,[b] provide brilliant skills to overcome South Fremantle after that team took the lead midway through the last quarter for the second time all match.[31]
  • Perth’s Mick Rea seems more intent upon pushing opponents around and kicks only two goals, but Perth have no trouble with the winless Royals even with his useless antics.[32]

Round 7[edit]

Round 7
Saturday, 14 May Subiaco 25.23 (173) def. South Fremantle 11.13 (79) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 2722)
Saturday, 14 May Perth 27.20 (182) def. Swan Districts 11.15 (81) WACA (crowd: 2736)
Saturday, 14 May West Perth 10.9 (69) def. by East Perth 14.13 (97) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2417) [33]
Saturday, 14 May East Fremantle 9.10 (64) def. by Claremont 11.16 (82) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4086)
  • In the wet conditions, Tiger ruckman Mal Thomson’s marking around the ground has him ear-marked for State honours, whilst Peter Melesso helps him at full-forward with five goals that force the Sharks – in Brian Peake’s record 263rd match for the club – to move top ruckman Lance Durack to full-back.[34]
  • Subiaco kick 20.19 (139) to 2.5 (17) after the 22-minute mark of the second quarter with devastating skills in wet weather as second-game Richard Caldow does a superb job on the wing replacing the out-of-form Greg Carpenter.[35]
  • Swan Districts kick 1.10 (16) in the second quarter as Perth – in amazing display on a muddy WACA and in spite of the return of Phil Narkle[36] – kick their highest score since 1980[26] and the season’s highest.

Round 8[edit]

Round 8
Saturday, 21 May Perth 13.11 (89) def. by South Fremantle 18.18 (126) WACA (crowd: 2713)
Saturday, 21 May Swan Districts 21.17 (143) def. East Perth 19.16 (130) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3028) [37]
Saturday, 21 May Claremont 18.15 (123) def. West Perth 6.20 (56) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3191)
Saturday, 21 May East Fremantle 18.13 (121) def. Subiaco 11.13 (79) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3593) [38]

South Fremantle stay in touch with the top four by overwhelming Perth after a slow start, with coach Wiley saying Perth did too little to attack the ball.[39]

Round 9[edit]

Round 9
Saturday, 28 May South Fremantle 20.15 (135) def. Swan Districts 14.12 (96) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3485) [40]
Saturday, 28 May East Perth 14.10 (94) def. by Subiaco 20.10 (130) WACA (crowd: 2656)
Saturday, 28 May Claremont 22.10 (142) def. Perth 16.13 (109) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3508) [41]
Saturday, 28 May West Perth 14.16 (100) def. by East Fremantle 18.14 (122) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2871) [42]

A blunder by Ray Ewen – handballing after a free kick[c] – that leads to a goal to Georgiades, plus several other serious mistakes derail East Perth’s determined effort to cause a big upset with a final-quarter charge. The Royals pressure Subiaco well but their lack of skill proved decisive.[43]

Round 10[edit]

Round 10
Saturday, 4 June Subiaco 16.19 (115) def. Swan Districts 10.8 (68) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3505)
Saturday, 4 June Perth 17.16 (118) def. West Perth 14.13 (97) WACA (crowd: 3123) [44]
Saturday, 4 June Claremont 17.12 (114) def. East Perth 10.13 (73) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3213)
Monday, 6 June South Fremantle 16.10 (106) def. East Fremantle 12.12 (84) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 9981)
  • East Perth suffer a fifth second-half fadeout for 1988 as Claremont score 14.7 (91) to 1.7 (13) after having been five goals behind. Scott and Owens score seven second-half goals between them after playing the first half in defence, whilst the Royals finish the game with sixteen fit players.[45]
  • South Fremantle end a ten-match losing run against their derby rivals with three late goals despite being in a desperately tired state, as the Bulldogs play “keepings-off” exceptionally well. Scott Watters has twenty kicks in the first half.[46]
  • Swan Districts, who have a mere 32 scoring shots to 120 in the three grades including only 2.0 (12) in the colts, enter a major crisis on and off the field.[5]

Round 11[edit]

Round 11
Saturday, 11 June Swan Districts 10.15 (75) def. by West Perth 16.17 (113) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 2946) [47]
Saturday, 11 June East Perth 14.15 (99) def. South Fremantle 13.12 (90) WACA (crowd: 3015)
Saturday, 11 June Subiaco 10.13 (73) def. by Claremont 15.13 (103) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6301)
Saturday, 11 June East Fremantle 22.11 (143) def. Perth 15.21 (111) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3547) [48]
  • Claremont record their seventh consecutive unbeaten match against Subiaco as Neesham’s cunning in short spells flatters the depleted Lions, who have only 3.6 (24) to 12.12 (84) on the board at three-quarter time.[49]
  • Boyup Brook recruit Andrew Embry completely destroys young Bulldog star Scott Watters to lead East Perth to a second win and a position only a game behind West Perth and Swan Districts.[50]

Round 12[edit]

Round 12
Saturday, 18 June Subiaco 11.8 (74) def. by West Perth 16.19 (115) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 3769) [51]
Saturday, 18 June Perth 18.13 (121) def. East Perth 17.11 (113) WACA (crowd: 3177)
Saturday, 18 June Claremont 18.18 (126) def. South Fremantle 11.9 (75) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3819)
Saturday, 18 June East Fremantle 18.17 (125) def. Swan Districts 18.6 (114) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 2878) [52]
  • For the third consecutive round South Fremantle lose a player (Craig Edwards) within the opening five minutes – with the result that the Bulldogs cannot threaten Claremont, whose defence marks superbly.[9]
  • Forwards Mick Rea and Wayne Ryder recapture their form of 1986 for the first time this season to kick four goals apiece and hold off the rapidly improving Royals and leave Perth two wins clear inside the four.[53]

Round 13[edit]

Round 13
Saturday, 25 June West Perth 17.22 (124) def. South Fremantle 8.9 (57) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2813)
Saturday, 25 June Perth 9.19 (73) def. Subiaco 9.8 (62) WACA (crowd: 4297)
Saturday, 25 June Swan Districts 11.10 (76) drew with Claremont 10.16 (76) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 2263)
Saturday, 25 June East Perth 13.12 (90) def. by East Fremantle 22.24 (156) WACA (crowd: 4297) [54]
  • The match between Swan Districts and Claremont is the only WAFL draw on Round 13. There have been draws on every other pre-1997 WAFL round except Round 17.[55]
  • For the third time in twenty-seven matches Peter Melesso saves Claremont from defeat with a kick after the siren.[56]
  • Former forward Phil “Speck” Bradmore’s hard defence crushes Shouth Fremantle in a fiery match where the frustrated Mark Bayliss remonstrates with several West Perth members during play after jumping the fence.[57]

Round 14[edit]

Round 14
Saturday, 2 July South Fremantle 21.10 (136) def. Subiaco 17.8 (110) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3000)
Saturday, 2 July Swan Districts 13.21 (99) def. by Perth 18.15 (123) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3100) [58]
Saturday, 2 July East Perth 15.11 (101) def. by West Perth 18.12 (120) Perth Oval (crowd: 2995) [59]
Saturday, 2 July East Fremantle 14.10 (94) def. by Claremont 17.19 (121) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 4514)
  • The physical power of Bayliss and Sumich allows South Fremantle a surprise win over Subiaco, aided by the dominance of returning ruckwan Edwards around the ground.[60]
  • Claremont overcome a major test by beating East Fremantle despite numerous injuries and being nineteen points behind early in the second quarter. Future Fremantle backline mainstay Dale Kickett in his second match proves outstanding up forward.[61]

Round 15[edit]

Round 15
Saturday, 9 July Swan Districts 20.22 (142) def. West Perth 11.12 (78) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3106)
Saturday, 9 July East Perth 9.17 (71) def. by South Fremantle 10.12 (72) WACA (crowd: 2600) [62]
Saturday, 9 July Claremont 17.15 (117) def. by Subiaco 18.11 (119) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3682)
Saturday, 9 July East Fremantle 21.14 (140) def. Perth 13.20 (98) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3626) [63]
  • Subiaco jump Claremont with 7.2 (44) to one goal in the opening 22 minutes and hold on to win a thriller after four consecutive defeats. Claremont player/coach Neesham was reported by three umpires and by Subiaco after he broke Glen Hutcheson’s jaw in another incident – being ultimately suspended for three matches.[64]
  • South Fremantle produce an amazing comeback to win from 35 points down after scoring only three goals in the first three quarters,[65] to the violent anger of Royal coach Gerard McNeill, who became upset at how defensive his team turned in that last quarter.
  • The dominance of a hard-running defence helps Swan Districts continue its improved form, as they keep West Perth goalless for the first 45 minutes to end any Falcon finals hopes. Grasso, Joe Cormack and Troy Ugle dominate for Swans.[66]

Round 16[edit]

Round 16
Saturday, 16 July South Fremantle 25.6 (156) def. Swan Districts 17.13 (115) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 3260) [67]
Saturday, 16 July Subiaco 18.18 (126) def. East Perth 13.3 (81) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 2928) [68]
Saturday, 16 July Perth 13.16 (94) def. by Claremont 23.17 (155) WACA (crowd: 3685)
Saturday, 16 July West Perth 17.19 (121) def. East Fremantle 13.10 (88) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2624)

Despite one brilliant mark by Mick Rea, Perth are overwhelmed apart from a 6.3 (39) to 4.7 (31) second quarter by a strengthened T1ger team that produces its best team football of 1988.[69]

Round 17[edit]

Round 17
Saturday, 23 July South Fremantle 13.13 (91) def. Perth 10.12 (72) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 2700)
Saturday, 23 July East Perth 10.12 (72) def. Swan Districts 6.8 (44) WACA (crowd: 1766)
Saturday, 23 July West Perth 7.7 (49) def. Claremont 4.6 (30) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2153) [70]
Saturday, 23 July Subiaco 6.7 (43) def. East Fremantle 3.9 (27) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 2717) [71]
  • On Perth’s wettest football day since 9 June, 1945 with 69.0 millimetres (2.72 in)[72] of rain, East Fremantle score just one goal after the two-minute mark of the first quarter, and their score is the lowest conceded by Subiaco since 2 July, 1932.[73]
  • With Wally Matera’s speed on a heavy ground and Perth’s wastefulness early in the opening quarter when they had the wind and conditions were easiest, South draw level with the Demons in fourth after a high-standard match for the conditions – where club colours were unrecognisable in the mud and darkness.[74]
  • Swan Districts fail to seal the wooden spoon as East Perth play much superior wet-weather football – especially in the third quarter when they score five goals – and the black and whites lose Allan Sidebottom to a back rupture.[75]

Round 18[edit]

Round 18
Saturday, 30 July Swan Districts 15.7 (97) def. by Subiaco 15.18 (108) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3103) [76]
Saturday, 30 July West Perth 13.8 (86) def. by Perth 19.14 (128) Leederville Oval (crowd: 4568)
Saturday, 30 July East Perth 11.6 (72) def. by Claremont 20.21 (141) WACA (crowd: 2757)
Saturday, 30 July East Fremantle 13.13 (91) def. by South Fremantle 26.20 (176) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6682)
  • Stan Magro, following his thirty-third birthday during the week, sees South Fremantle produce a brilliant display and voerake Perth on percentage for fourth position. Although young Sumich scored five goals nine behinds, Craig Edwards with an outstanding eighteen marks and twenty kicks and centre half-back John McDonald were the stars.[77]
  • A dramatic second-half fadeout by West Perth – following upon a first quarter where they obtained 78 kicks to 30 and 28 marks to just four – results from Perth’s switch of former Richmond premiership player Stephen Mount to centre half-forward. After that move the Demons score 16.11 (107) to 4.3 (27).[78]

Round 19[edit]

Round 19
Saturday, 6 August South Fremantle 22.7 (139) def. West Perth 16.15 (111) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 4622) [79]
Saturday, 6 August Perth 15.12 (102) def. by Subiaco 18.21 (129) WACA (crowd: 4187)
Saturday, 6 August Claremont 18.16 (124) def. Swan Districts 11.7 (73) Claremont Oval (crowd: 2727) [80]
Saturday, 6 August East Fremantle 13.15 (93) def. by East Perth 16.15 (111) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 2391)

East Fremantle – clear second in mid-July – become in danger of losing fourth position by losing to last-placed East Perth, who make many mistakes by skilfull exploit the Sharks’ poor discipline in a rough match.[81] Top rover David Bushell – the worst offender – obtained three weeks suspension plus a nominal fine of one dollar at Monday night’s tribunal session.[82]

Round 20[edit]

Round 20
Sunday, 14 August (11:40 am) Claremont 13.20 (98) def. by South Fremantle 16.9 (105) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6486)
Sunday, 14 August (2:15 pm) Subiaco 20.20 (140) def. West Perth 7.17 (59) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 6486) [83]
Sunday, 14 August (2:15 pm) Perth 16.12 (108) def. East Perth 15.13 (103) WACA (crowd: 2632)
Sunday, 14 August (2:15 pm) East Fremantle 16.19 (115) def. Swan Districts 11.13 (79) East Fremantle Oval (crowd: 2335) [84]
  • South Fremantle hold off an inaccurate Claremont – for whom Melesso kicked 2.6 (18) – to be in the box seat for a first finals berth since 1983, standing 2.04 percent ahead of East Fremantle and a game and 3.6 percent ahead of Perth.[85]
  • Wayne Ryder boots Perth into a possible finals place via a brilliant after-the-siren goal from fifty metres out on the boundary line, after the Royals put a hurried kick from a congested pack out on the full.[86]

Round 21[edit]

Round 21
Saturday, 20 August South Fremantle 16.19 (115) def. Subiaco 11.12 (78) Fremantle Oval (crowd: 6618) [87]
Saturday, 20 August Swan Districts 17.11 (113) def. by Perth 26.13 (169) Bassendean Oval (crowd: 3541) [88]
Saturday, 20 August West Perth 15.17 (107) def. by East Perth 16.17 (113) Leederville Oval (crowd: 2468) [89]
Saturday, 20 August Claremont 12.16 (88) def. by East Fremantle 18.14 (122) Claremont Oval (crowd: 3871)
  • For the second successive season, East Perth avoid the wooden spoon with a last round win.
  • Perth keep pressure on all through, including a huge-scoring last quarter that sees 19.5 (120) kicked, only to realise that wins by the two Fremantle clubs had ensured the Demons miss the finals and ended the career of Mick Rea – who kicked 14 goals in the reserves.[90]
  • Debutant ruckman Clinton Wolf combines with key forwards Clinton Browning and Colin waterson to produce East Fremantle’s finest display of 1988 and unexpectedly stay fourth against the Perth challenge.[91]

Ladder[edit]

1988 WAFL Ladder
TEAM P W L D PF PA  % PTS
1 Claremont 21 14 6 1 2354 1796 131.07% 58
2 Subiaco 21 14 7 0 2296 1916 119.83% 56
3 South Fremantle 21 13 8 0 2306 2137 107.91% 52
4 East Fremantle 21 13 8 0 2226 2104 105.80% 52
5 Perth 21 12 9 0 2397 2280 105.13% 48
6 West Perth 21 8 13 0 1992 2201 90.50% 32
7 East Perth 21 5 16 0 1905 2408 79.11% 20
8 Swan Districts 21 4 16 1 1991 2625 75.85% 18
Key: P = Played, W = Won, L = Lost, D = Drawn, PF = Points For, PA = Points Against

Finals[edit]

First Semi-Final[edit]

First Semi Final
Saturday, 27 August South Fremantle 14.20 (104) def. by East Fremantle 24.14 (158) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 19,668) [92]

South Fremantle, playing in the finals for the first time since 1983 and with only three players having previous experience therein, do not cope with the pressure. Boom forward Sumich scores 1.7 (13).

Second Semi-Final[edit]

Second Semi Final
Sunday, 4 September Claremont 22.12 (144) def. Subiaco 17.17 (119) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 11,175)
  • In order to accommodate televising the Eagles’ first VFL final to Perth, the last three WAFL finals were played on the Sunday for the first time.
  • Peter Melesso kicks nine goals in Claremont’s 17.5 (107) to 5.7 (37) first half, before going on what he terms “walkabout” and not adding to his tally, as Claremont’s fade-out proves ominous for the “big one”.[93]

Preliminary Final[edit]

Preliminary Final
Sunday, 11 September Subiaco 19.10 (124) def. East Fremantle 17.19 (121) Subiaco Oval (crowd: 13,112)

Lion rooking Gary Kemp goals with thirty seconds remaining to win a fluctuating match where Subiaco score only 4.5 (29) to 13.11 (89) in the second and third quarters. Key Shark defender Shane Ellis was injured and could not counter John Georgiades, who kicks three goals in each of the first and final quarters.[94]

Grand Final[edit]

Main article: 1988 WAFL Grand Final
1988 WAFL Grand Final
Sunday, 18 September Claremont def. by Subiaco Subiaco Oval (Crowd: 28,183) [95]
2.3 (15)
5.6 (36)
5.9 (39)
8.12 (60)
Q1
Q2
Q3
Final
3.3 (21)
6.4 (40)
10.7 (67)
19.8 (122)
Umpires: Phil O‘Reilly, D. Johnson
Simpson Medal: Mick Lee (Subiaco)
Malaxos 3, Brayshow 2, Ahmat, Allan, Neesham Goals Georgiades 6, Cocker 3, McDougall 2, Jones 2, Breman 2, Jennings, Brian Taylor, Lee, Carpenter
Neesham, Pyke, David O‘Connell, Beers, Scott, Thorne Best Keene, Georgiades, Brian Taylor, Breman, Carpenter, Neil Taylor, Willet, Lee
Peter Melesso for striking Rod Willet in first quarter (three umpires)
Peter Melesso for striking Ian Dargie in first quarter
Dale Kickett for unduly rough play toward Clint Brown in first quarter
Reports Ian Dargie for striking Peter Thorne in first quarter

Subiaco, aided controversially by Eagle Laurie Keene and providing a more traditional style against Neesham’s innovative “chip and draw” which had demolished all opponents during the previous season, run away with the game after half-time in hot 31 °C (88 °F) weather.[1]


Notes[edit]

a The only other clubs to finish last in all three grades since 1957 have been Peel Thunder in their inaugural 1997 season and West Perth in 1992. No club has won premierships in all three grades in this time span.
b Billy was the younger brother of former Tiger stars – then with North MelbourneJimmy and Phil Krakouer.
c As in the VFL, handballing after a free kick was banned in the 1988 and 1989 WAFL seasons, with a ball-up occurring for breaches.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Devaney, John; Full Points Footy’s WA Football Companion; p. 278. ISBN 978-0-9556897-1-0
  2. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Vancouver Match Angers Cumminsky’; The West Australian, 27 June 1988, p. 116
  3. ^ Denham, Greg and Stocks, Gary; ‘New Draft Puts WAFL Clubs “on Death Row”’; The West Australian, 12 July 1988, pp. 100, 98
  4. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Keene Puts Spring in Subiaco Training’; The West Australian, 8 September 1988, p. 128
  5. ^ a b Stocks, Gary; ‘Swans Face a Testing Period’; The West Australian, 6 June 1988, p. 79
  6. ^ WAFL Reserves Ladder Positions (download)
  7. ^ WAFL Colts Ladder Positions (download)
  8. ^ a b McDonald, Ron; ‘Bulldogs Baffled’; The West Australian, 11 April 1988, p. 96
  9. ^ a b McDonald, Ron; ‘Injuries Continue to Take Toll at South’; The West Australian, 20 June 1988, p. 94
  10. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Claremont Con Trick: Subiaco Fall for Neesham Sting’; The West Australian, 5 April 1988, p. 108
  11. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Crowd Figures Delight WAFL’; The West Australian, 5 April 1988, p. 108
  12. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Bulldogs Come Out Biting’; The West Australian, 5 April 1988, p. 106
  13. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘King the Ruler for Falcons’; The West Australian, 5 April 1988, p. 107
  14. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘A Victory, but Not So Sweet for the Lions’; The West Australian, 11 April 1988, p. 97
  15. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Christie – the Reluctant Hero’; The West Australian, 11 April 1988, p. 97
  16. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Wiley’s Perth Plan Pays Off’; The West Australian, 11 April 1988, p. 96
  17. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Falcons’ Talent Spread too Thinly’; The West Australian, 18 April 1988, p. 87
  18. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘New Home but Same Old Story’; The West Australian, 18 April 1988, p. 86
  19. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Bayliss – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’; The West Australian, 18 April 1988, p. 86
  20. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Subiaco Big Men Sound Warning’; The West Australian, 18 April 1988, p. 87
  21. ^ See Marsh, David; ‘Four-Week Suspension for Owens’; The West Australian, 19 April 1988, p. 83
  22. ^ Subiaco: Biggest Wins
  23. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Sharks Attacked: Boom Side’s Unbeaten Run Comes to an End’; The West Australian, 25 April 1988, p. 68
  24. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Fighting Swans Move Up’; The West Australian, 26 April 1988, p. 111
  25. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Same Old Story for Bulldogs’; The West Australian, 26 April 1988, p. 111
  26. ^ a b WAFL Footy Facts: Perth Highest Scores For
  27. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Edgar Makes Happy Return’; The West Australian, 2 May 1988, p. 87
  28. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Dargie Does It His Way’; The West Australian, 2 May 1988, p. 88
  29. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Rioli’s Absence No Real Worry’; The West Australian, 2 May 1988, p. 87
  30. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Young Sharks Pass Test’; The West Australian, 9 May 1988, p. 83
  31. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Tigers in 1987 Revisited: Premiership Qualities Rise in Pressure Win’; The West Australian, 9 May 1988, p. 82
  32. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Rea’s Side-Show Does Little for Perth’s Hopes’; The West Australian, 9 May 1988, p. 88
  33. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Monteath to Bring Out the Axe’; The West Australian, 16 May 1988, p. 95
  34. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Tigers Find a Hero in Mal’; The West Australian, 16 May 1988, p. 96
  35. ^ Casellas, Ken; ‘Caldow Grabs His Chance This Time’; The West Australian, 16 May 1988, p. 95
  36. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Red-Hot Demons Rolling Toward Promised Land’; The West Australian, 16 May 1988, p. 95
  37. ^ ‘Eagles Duo Sink a Royal Challenge’; The West Australian, 23 May 1988, p. 105
  38. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Jackpot Result for Baxter Gamble’; The West Australian, 23 May 1988, p. 104
  39. ^ ‘Relief as Bulldogs Stay in Touch’; The West Australian, 23 May 1988, p. 104
  40. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Sumich and Sanbrailo Show Way’; The West Australian, 30 May 1988, p. 101
  41. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Demons Flounder on the Claremont Rock’; The West Australian, 30 May 1988, p. 100
  42. ^ Marsh, David; ‘No Disgrace as Falcons Go Down Fighting’; The West Australian, 30 May 1988, p. 100
  43. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Elusive Subiaco Find the Answers’; The West Australian, 30 May 1988, p. 101
  44. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Perth Cruise In against Falcons’; The West Australian, 6 June 1988, p. 79
  45. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Half-Time Blues Sink East Perth’; The West Australian, 6 June 1988, p. 78
  46. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Bulldogs End the Derby Drought’; The West Australian, 7 June 1988, p. 103
  47. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Sad Swans Easy Prey for Falcons’; The West Australian, 13 June 1988, p. 94
  48. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Sharks Find the Magic Blood’; The West Australian, 13 June 1988, p. 95
  49. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Lions Feel Bite of the Spiderman’; The West Australian, 13 June 1988, p. 94
  50. ^ Lewis, Ross ‘Tagger Embry Sets Up Royals’; The West Australian, 13 June 1988, p. 95
  51. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Mifka Gives Eagles Food for Thought’; The West Australian, 20 June 1988, p. 94
  52. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Force Is with Swans Again’; The West Australian, 20 June 1988, p. 95
  53. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Rea Bounces Back to Set Up Victory’; The West Australian, 20 June 1988, p. 94
  54. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Sharks Merciless in Massacre: Bushell Batters Royals’; The West Australian, 27 June 1988, p. 114
  55. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Round 13
  56. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Melesso’s Rescue Cheers Neesham’; The West Australian, 27 June 1988, p. 115
  57. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘“Speck” in a New Voyage of Discovery’; The West Australian, 27 June 1988, p. 114
  58. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘“Old” Team Link Up To Sink Swans’; The West Australian, 4 July 1988, p. 107
  59. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘Former Royals Returns to Haunt His Old Club’; The West Australian, 4 July 1988, p. 107
  60. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Bulldogs Pull One from Hat for Mr. Magic’; The West Australian, 4 July 1988, p. 106
  61. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Sharks Beached – Third-Term Burst Proves Decisive’; The West Australian, 4 July 1988, p. 107
  62. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Torment as Royals Throw It All Away’; The West Australian, 11 July 1988, p. 91
  63. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Baxter’s Patience Pays Off’; The West Australian, 11 July 1988, p. 92
  64. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Neesham banned Three Weeks’; The West Australian, 12 July 1988, p. 98
  65. ^ WAFL Footy Facts: Won from Third Quarter Deficit
  66. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘Grasso Puts Block on the Falcons’; The West Australian, 11 July 1988, p. 91
  67. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘South Treat Small Crowd’; The West Australian, 18 July 1988, p. 95
  68. ^ ‘Mis-Casting Pays Off for Lions’; The West Australian, 18 July 1988, p. 96
  69. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Sad Demons Will Recall Key Players’; The West Australian, 18 July 1988, p. 94
  70. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Falcons a Big Threat’; The West Australian, 25 July 1988, p. 93
  71. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘The Lions Are Roaring Again’; The West Australian, 25 July 1988, p. 92
  72. ^ Perth Regional Office (009034) July 1988 rainfall
  73. ^ Subiaco: Lowest Scores Conceded
  74. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Little Matera Is a Muddy Marvel’; The West Australian, 25 July 1988, p. 91
  75. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘Bad News for Swans as Royals Rejoice’; The West Australian, 25 July 1988, p. 91
  76. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘Bunton Sees Benefit from Tight Encounter’; The West Australian, 1 August 1988, p. 99
  77. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘A Birthday to Savour’; The West Australian, 1 August 1988, p. 101
  78. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Falcons Flop and No Two Ways about It’; The West Australian, 1 August 1988, p. 100
  79. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Bulldogs’ Win Is Just what Doctor Ordered’; The West Australian, 8 August 1988, p. 97
  80. ^ Marsh, David; ‘Swans’ Plight No Laughing Matter’; The West Australian, 8 August 1988, p. 96
  81. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘Bushell Smacks Himself in the Face’; The West Australian, 8 August 1988, p. 97
  82. ^ ‘Three Weeks and $1’; The West Australian, 9 August 1988, p. 92
  83. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘The Happy Wanderer Runs riot’; The West Australian, 15 August 1988, p. 127
  84. ^ Denham, Greg; ‘Some You Win, Some You Lose’; The West Australian, 15 August 1988, p. 128
  85. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Magnificent Seven Save the Bulldogs’; The West Australian, 15 August 1988, p. 128
  86. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Ryder Boots Perth Home’; The West Australian, 15 August 1988, p. 129
  87. ^ Thompson, Brad; ‘Cruising Bulldogs Ease Past Lions’; The West Australian, 22 August 1988, p. 116
  88. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Scoreboard Drama Ends Demons’ Joy’; The West Australian, 22 August 1988, p. 117
  89. ^ Lewis, Ross; ‘Time To Reflect as Royals Escape the Spoon’; The West Australian, 22 August 1988, p. 116
  90. ^ McDonald, Ron; ‘Rea Is Ready to Bow Out’; The West Australian, 22 August 1988, p. 117
  91. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Wolf Sheds Tears of Joy’; The West Australian, 22 August 1988, p. 116
  92. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Sharks on Course for Final’; The West Australian, 29 August 1988, p. 125
  93. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Melesso Magic’; The West Australian, 5 September 1988, p. 124
  94. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Lions Again Deny Ellis His Moment’; The West Australian, 12 September 1988, p. 124
  95. ^ Stocks, Gary; ‘Keene Mauls Tigers’; The West Australian; 19 September 1988; p. 144

External links[edit]