1999 LE31

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1999 LE31
1999 LE31 asteroid - orbit diagram 01.jpg
Diagram of the orbit of 1999 LE31
Discovery
Discovered by Lincoln Laboratory Near-Earth Asteroid Research Team at Socorro
Discovery date June 12, 1999
Designations
damocloid
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc 409 days (1.12 yr)
Aphelion 11.939 AU (1.7860 Tm)
Perihelion 4.3386 AU (649.05 Gm)
8.1385 AU (1.21750 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.46691
23.22 yr (8480.41 d)
266.052°
0° 2m 32.824s /day
Inclination 151.812° (retrograde)
292.018°
32.5005°[1]
Earth MOID 3.35736 AU (502.254 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.527518 AU (78.9156 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 16.8 km[2]
Mean radius
8.4 ± 2.1 km
0.056 ± 0.026[2]
12.4[2]

1999 LE31 is a damocloid centaur[2] discovered on June 12, 1999.[3] It is both a Jupiter and Saturn-crossing minor planet.[2]

1999 LE31 spends most of its orbit located in the outer Solar System between Jupiter and Uranus,[4] and like all centaurs, has an unstable orbit caused by the gravitational influence of the giant planets. Due to this, it must have originated from elsewhere, most likely outside Neptune.[4]

Of over half a million known minor planets, 1999 LE31 is one of about 60 that has a retrograde orbit.[5]

1999 LE31 is approximately 16.8 km in diameter.[2][3] It came to perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) in December 1998.[6] It was last observed in 2000, and will next come to perihelion in February 2022.[2]

Observations[edit]

This asteroid has been recorded at such observatories as:[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 1999-M29 : 1999 LE31". Minorplanetcenter.org. Retrieved 2011-07-11. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (1999 LE31)" (last observation: 2000-06-29; arc: 1.12 yr). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 29 March 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "BAA Comet Section Comets of 1999". Ast.cam.ac.uk. Retrieved 2011-07-11. 
  4. ^ a b Horner, J.; Evans, N.W.; Bailey, M. E. (2004). "Simulations of the Population of Centaurs I: The Bulk Statistics". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 354 (3): 798–810. arXiv:astro-ph/0407400free to read. Bibcode:2004MNRAS.354..798H. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.08240.x. 
  5. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: Asteroids and i > 90 (deg)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 2014-11-15. 
  6. ^ Seiichi Yoshida (2010-07-03). "1999 LE31". Seiichi Yoshida's Comet Catalog. Retrieved 2014-11-15. 

External links[edit]