2010 RX30

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2010 RX30
Discovery[1]
Discovered byMt. Lemmon Survey
Discovery siteSummerhaven, Arizona, USA
Discovery date5 September 2010
Designations
MPC designation2010 RX30
MPO 279189
NEO · Aten[2]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3[1]
Observation arc1073[1] d
Aphelion1.15342 AU (172.549 Gm)
Perihelion0.50803 AU (76.000 Gm)
0.83073 AU (124.275 Gm)
Eccentricity0.38845
0.76 yr (276.558 d)
0.76 yr
338.78°
1° 18m 7.56s /day
Inclination5.05966°
166.154°
319.80°
Earth MOID0.00108035 AU (161,618 km)[2]
Mercury MOID0.17834 AU (26,679,000 km)[1]
Jupiter MOID3.91055 AU (585.010 Gm)[2]
Physical characteristics
Dimensions12 m[3]
Mass2.5×106 kg[3]
27.1[2]

2010 RX30 is a micro-asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Aten group. On 8 September 2010 at 09:51 UTC, it passed between the Earth and the Moon approaching Earth within 248000kilometres above Japan.[4]

NASA estimated its size to be 12 metres in diameter with a mass of around 2500 tonnes.[3]

The asteroid was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey near Tucson, Arizona on 5 September 2010, along with 2010 RF12.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "2010 RX30". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 16 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e "(2010 RX30)". JPL Small-Body Database. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. SPK-ID: 3545558. Retrieved 16 August 2017.
  3. ^ a b c 2010 RX30 Impact Risk
  4. ^ Finch, L. (September 8, 2010). "Harvard scientists keep an eye on wayward asteroids". The Boston Globe.
  5. ^ Than, Ker (September 8, 2010). "Second Asteroid to Buzz Earth Later Today". National Geographic News. National Geographic Society.

External links[edit]