2423 Ibarruri

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2423 Ibarruri
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Zhuravleva
Discovery site Crimean Astrophysical Obs.
Discovery date 14 July 1972
Designations
MPC designation (2423) Ibarruri
Named after
Rubén Ibárruri
(Hero of the Soviet Union)[2]
1972 NC · 1930 SV
1943 TB · 1956 VC
1972 PB
Mars-crosser[3][4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 60.59 yr (22,129 days)
Aphelion 2.8068 AU
Perihelion 1.5702 AU
2.1885 AU
Eccentricity 0.2825
3.24 yr (1,183 days)
315.42°
Inclination 4.0571°
264.96°
80.645°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 4.899±1.085[5]
6.50 km (calculated)[3]
73.08±0.10 h[6]
139.79±0.04 h[a]
139.9±0.2 h[7]
139.92±0.01 h[8]
0.20 (assumed)[3]
0.330±0.167[5]
SMASS = A[1][9]
L[10] · S[11] · C[3]
13.3[1] · 13.44±1.15[10] · 13.20[11] · 13.3[3]

2423 Ibarruri, provisional designation 1972 NC, is an eccentric, tumbling and rare-type asteroid, classified as slow rotator and sizable Mars-crosser from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 5 kilometers in diameter.

The asteroid was discovered by Russian–Ukrainian astronomer Lyudmila Zhuravleva at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj, on 14 July 1972.[4] It was named after Spanish communist Rubén Ruiz Ibárruri.[2]

Orbit and classification[edit]

Ibarruri orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.6–2.8 AU once every 3 years and 3 months (1,183 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.28 and an inclination of 4° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Physical characteristics[edit]

The spectral type of the asteroid is that of a rare A-type in the SMASS taxonomy, with its surface consisting of almost pure olivine, which gives the body a very reddish color. As of November 2015, only 17 minor planets of this type are known.[12]

As a spectroscopic A-type asteroid, it belongs to the larger group of bodies with a silicaceous composition. However, the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link classifies the asteroid into the carbonaceous group, despite the fact that is assumes a relatively high geometric albedo of 0.20,[3] which is rather typical for stony asteroids.

Slow rotator and tumbler[edit]

Ibarruri has a notably slow rotation period of 140 hours,[a][7] and seems to be in a non-principal axis rotation (NPAR), colloquially called as "tumbling".[13]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after Rubén Ruiz Ibárruri (1920–1942), son of Spanish communist leader Dolores Ibárruri and a posthumous Hero of the Soviet Union. He enlisted in the Soviet army and died in the early stage of the Battle of Stalingrad in September 1942.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 8 February 1982 (M.P.C. 6649).[14]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pravec (2011) web: lightcurve plot for (2423) Ibarruri with a rotation period 139.79±0.04 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.74 mag. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2423 Ibarruri (1972 NC)" (2017-06-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 13 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2423) Ibarruri. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 198. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (2423) Ibarruri". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "2423 Ibarruri (1972 NC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  5. ^ a b Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. arXiv:1509.02522Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  6. ^ Vander Haagen, Gary A. (April 2012). "Lightcurves of 724 Hapag, 2423 Ibarruri, 4274 Karamanov 4339 Almamater, and 5425 Vojtech.". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (2): 48–50. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...48V. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Buchheim, Robert K. (October 2012). "Lightcurves of 2423 Ibarruri and 8345 Ulmerspatz". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (4): 209–211. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..209B. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  8. ^ Ferrero, Andrea (April 2012). "Lightcurve Determination at the Bigmuskie Observatory from 2011 July-December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (2): 65–67. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...65F. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  9. ^ Xu, Shui; Binzel, Richard P.; Burbine, Thomas H.; Bus, Schelte J. (May 1995). "Small main-belt asteroid spectroscopic survey: Initial results". Icarus: 1–35. Bibcode:1995Icar..115....1X. ISSN 0019-1035. doi:10.1006/icar.1995.1075. Retrieved 25 November 2015. 
  10. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  11. ^ a b Carry, B.; Solano, E.; Eggl, S.; DeMeo, F. E. (April 2016). "Spectral properties of near-Earth and Mars-crossing asteroids using Sloan photometry". Icarus. 268: 340–354. Bibcode:2016Icar..268..340C. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.047. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: spec. type = A (SMASSII)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 25 November 2015. 
  13. ^ Pravec, P.; Scheirich, P.; Durech, J.; Pollock, J.; Kusnirák, P.; Hornoch, K.; et al. (May 2014). "The tumbling spin state of (99942) Apophis". Icarus. 233: 48–60. Bibcode:2014Icar..233...48P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.01.026. Retrieved 25 November 2015. 
  14. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 7 December 2016. 

External links[edit]