3288 Seleucus

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3288 Seleucus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by H.-E. Schuster
Discovery site La Silla Obs.
Discovery date 28 February 1982
Designations
MPC designation (3288) Seleucus
Named after
Seleucus I Nicator
(Seleucid Empire)[2]
1982 DV
Amor · NEO[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 33.97 yr (12,406 days)
Aphelion 2.9605 AU
Perihelion 1.1052 AU
2.0329 AU
Eccentricity 0.4563
2.90 yr (1,059 days)
9.1669°
0° 20m 24s / day
Inclination 5.9306°
218.66°
349.29°
Earth MOID 0.1016 AU · 39.5 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 2.2 km[4]
2.49±0.07 km[5]
2.8 km (Gehrels)[1]
2.832±1.100 km[6]
16 h (dated)[7]
75±5 h[8]
75 h[9]
0.139±0.127[6]
0.22 (Gehrels)[1]
0.23[4]
0.24±0.04[5]
B–V = 0.910[1]
U–B = 0.500[1]
S (Tholen)[1] · K (SMASS)[1] · S[10]
15.2[5] · 15.3[1] · 15.5[4][10] · 15.50±0.3[6] · 15.6±0.3[8]

3288 Seleucus, provisional designation 1982 DV, is a rare-type stony asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Amor group of asteroids, approximately 2.5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 28 February 1982, by German astronomer Hans-Emil Schuster at ESO's La Silla Observatory site in northern Chile.[3] It was named after the Hellenistic general and Seleucid ruler Seleucus I Nicator.[2]

Orbit[edit]

Seleucus orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.1–3.0 AU once every 2 years and 11 months (1,059 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.46 and an inclination of 6° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] Seleucus has a Earth minimum orbital intersection distance of 0.1016 AU (15,200,000 km), which corresponds to 39.5 lunar distances.[1] As no precoveries were taken, and no prior identifications were made, the body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at La Silla.[3]

Physical parameters[edit]

On the Tholen and SMASS taxonomic scheme, Seleucus is classified as a featureless S-type and rare K-type asteroid, respectively.[1] It has a relatively long rotation period of 75 hours with a brightness variation of 1.0 magnitude, indicative of a non-spheroidal shape (U=3/3).[8][9] While most minor planets have spin rate between 2 and 20 hours, Seleucus still rotates faster than a typical slow rotator, which have periods above 100 hours.

According to the survey carried out by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Seleucus measures 2.49 and 2.83 kilometers in diameter, and its surface has an albedo of 0.139 and 0.24, respectively.[5][6] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link adopts an albedo of 0.23 and a diameter of 2.2 kilometers, based on modeled data by Alan Harris.[4][10]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet is named for Seleucus I Nicator, a general in the army of Alexander the Great, and, after the death of Alexander, founder and king of the Seleucid Empire. The lunar crater Seleucus is also named after him.[2] Naming citation was published on 29 September 1985 (M.P.C. 10046).[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3288 Seleucus (1982 DV)" (2016-02-16 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (3288) Seleucus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 274. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "3288 Seleucus (1982 DV)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d Harris, Alan W. (February 1998). "A Thermal Model for Near-Earth Asteroids". Icarus. 131 (2): 291–301. Bibcode:1998Icar..131..291H. doi:10.1006/icar.1997.5865. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. arXiv:1509.02522Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  6. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; et al. (November 2012). "Physical Parameters of Asteroids Estimated from the WISE 3-Band Data and NEOWISE Post-Cryogenic Survey". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 760 (1): 6. Bibcode:2012ApJ...760L..12M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/760/1/L12. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  7. ^ Debehogne, H.; de Sanctis, G.; Zappala, V. (August 1983). "Photoelectric photometry of asteroids 45, 120, 776, 804, 814, and 1982DV". Icarus: 236–244. Bibcode:1983Icar...55..236D. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(83)90078-7. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W.; Bowell, E.; Tholen, D. J. (November 1999). "Asteroid Lightcurve Observations from 1981 to 1983". Icarus. 142 (1). Bibcode:1999Icar..142..173H. doi:10.1006/icar.1999.6181. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Pravec, P.; Harris, A. W.; Scheirich, P.; Kusnirák, P.; Sarounová, L.; Hergenrother, C. W.; et al. (January 2005). "Tumbling asteroids". Icarus. 173 (1): 108–131. Bibcode:2005Icar..173..108P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2004.07.021. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  10. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (3288) Seleucus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 9 January 2017. 
  11. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 9 January 2017. 

External links[edit]