356 Liguria

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356 Liguria
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date 21 January 1893
Designations
MPC designation (356) Liguria
Named after
Liguria
1893 G
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 123.10 yr (44961 d)
Aphelion 3.4123 AU (510.47 Gm)
Perihelion 2.10382 AU (314.727 Gm)
2.75806 AU (412.600 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.23721
4.58 yr (1673.0 d)
28.9708°
0° 12m 54.648s / day
Inclination 8.2243°
354.796°
78.566°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 131.31±2.6 km[1]
134.76 ± 5.17 km[2]
Mass (7.83 ± 1.50) × 1018 kg[2]
Mean density
6.10 ± 1.36 g/cm3[2]
31.82 h (1.326 d)
0.0528±0.002
8.22

356 Liguria is a very large main-belt asteroid that was discovered by Auguste Charlois on January 21, 1893, in Nice. It is one of seven of Charlois's discoveries that was expressly named by the Astromomisches Rechen-Institut (Astronomical Calculation Institute), and was named for the Italian region.[3]

13-cm radar observations of this asteroid from the Arecibo Observatory between 1980 and 1985 were used to produce a diameter estimate of 155 km.[4]

Since 1991, the asteroid has been observed in stellar occultation a total of 6 times, all but one were single chord occultations. A 2006 double chord observation indicated a diameter of 126.6 +/-8.3 km.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yeomans, Donald K., "356 Liguria", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 11 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ Schmadel Lutz D. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (fifth edition), Springer, 2003. ISBN 3-540-00238-3.
  4. ^ Ostro, S. J.; et al. (August 1985), "Mainbelt asteroids - Dual-polarization radar observations", Science, 229 (4712), pp. 442–446, Bibcode:1985Sci...229..442O, doi:10.1126/science.229.4712.442, PMID 17738665. 
  5. ^ "Asteroid Data Sets". sbn.psi.edu. Retrieved 2018-05-26. 

External links[edit]