3752 Camillo

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3752 Camillo
3752 Camillo orbit-2018.png
The orbit of Camillo is highly inclined. Vertical lines show the distance above and below the ecliptic every 30 days.
Discovery [1]
Discovered by E. F. Helin
M. Barucci
Discovery site CERGA Obs.
Discovery date 15 August 1985
Designations
MPC designation (3752) Camillo
Named after
Camillo (son of King Turno and son of discoverer)[2]
1985 PA
NEO · Apollo[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 23 March 2018 (JD 2458200.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 42.26 yr (15,436 d)
Aphelion 1.8400 AU
Perihelion 0.9871 AU
1.4135 AU
Eccentricity 0.3017
1.68 yr (614 d)
41.249°
0° 35m 11.4s / day
Inclination 55.555°
147.98°
312.22°
Earth MOID 0.0780 AU (30.3871 LD)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
2.3 km (approx.)[4]
2.306±0.088 km[5][6]
2.328 km[7]
2.33 km (taken)[8]
37.846 h[9]
37.881±0.005 h[10]
0.210±0.036[5][6]
0.22[4]
0.2234[7]
S (assumed)[8]
15.3[3] · 15.41[8][9] · 15.41±0.13[7] · 15.5[5]

3752 Camillo is a highly inclined asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group, approximately 2.3 kilometers (1.4 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 15 August 1985, by astronomers Eleanor Helin and Maria Barucci using a 0.9-metre (35 in) telescope at the CERGA Observatory in Caussols, France. Lightcurve studies by Petr Pravec in 1998 suggest that the assumed S-type asteroid has an elongated shape and a longer-than average rotation period of 38 hours.[1][4]

Orbit[edit]

Camillo orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.99–1.8 AU once every 20 months (614 days; semi-major axis of 1.41 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.30 and an inclination of 56° with respect to the ecliptic.[3]

Close approaches[edit]

The closest point between the orbit of the Earth and the orbit of this asteroid (Earth MOID) is currently 0.0780 AU (11,670,000 km; 7,250,000 mi) or 30 lunar distances,[3] so Camillo does not come close enough to Earth to qualify as a potentially hazardous asteroid. It came to perihelion on 6 January 1976 and on 17 February 1976, and passed 0.08013 AU (11,987,000 km; 7,449,000 mi) from Earth.[3]

2013 passage[edit]

Camillo came to perihelion on 27 December 2012.[3] On 12 February 2013 the asteroid passed 0.14775 AU (22,103,000 km; 13,734,000 mi) from Earth[3] and had an apparent magnitude of 13.[4] During the 2013 passage the asteroid was studied by radar using Goldstone and Arecibo.[4]

3752 Camillo skypath-2013.png
Camillo's south to north daily motion in the sky as seen from the earth

2018 passage[edit]

On February 20, 2018, the asteroid passed by Earth. It was observed on radar by Arecibo Observatory and shown to have a long angular double-lobed shape.[11] At 0.13 AU (19,000,000 km; 12,000,000 mi) distance its peak magnitude was about 13.

3752 Camillo skypath-2018.png
Camillo's south to north daily motion in the sky as seen from the earth
Left: A 25 minute timelapse sequence of 3752 Camillo taken from Northolt Branch Observatories (London, UK) on 22 February 2018, two days after closest approach. The asteroid can be seen at apparent magnitude +14, moving upwards through the image. Brightness is inverted (stars appear dark, the sky background appears light). Camillo was about 21.9 million km (13.6 million mi) from Earth at that time.[12] Right: Camillo as seen from Northolt Branch Observatories on 22 February 2018. The image is corrected for the asteroid's motion, so stars appear trailed.[13]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named for the son of the early Roman King Turno. "Camillo" is also the name of the discoverer's son.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 20 May 1989 (M.P.C. 14633).[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "3752 Camillo (1985 PA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 10 May 2018. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (3752) Camillo. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 317. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3752 Camillo (1985 PA)" (2018-05-03 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 10 May 2018. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (November 15, 2012). "3752 Camillo Goldstone Radar Observations Planning". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2012-11-23. 
  5. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 10 May 2018.  (catalog)
  6. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (December 2011). "NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 743 (2): 17. arXiv:1109.6400Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743..156M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/156. Retrieved 10 May 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (3752) Camillo". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 10 May 2018. 
  9. ^ a b Pravec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Sarounová, Lenka (November 1998). "Lightcurves of 26 Near-Earth Asteroids". Icarus. 136 (1): 124–153. Bibcode:1998Icar..136..124P. doi:10.1006/icar.1998.5993. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  10. ^ Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Behrend, R.; Carry, B.; Delbo, M.; et al. (February 2016). "New and updated convex shape models of asteroids based on optical data from a large collaboration network" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 586: 24. arXiv:1510.07422Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016A&A...586A.108H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527441. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "Radar images of 3752 Camillo". Arecibo Observatory (on Twitter). 21 February 2018. 
  12. ^ Wells, G.; Bamberger, D. (22 February 2018). "3752 Camillo". Northolt Branch Observatories. Retrieved 10 May 2018. 
  13. ^ Wells, G.; Bamberger, D. (22 February 2018). "Near Earth asteroids 2017 VR12, 3752 Camillo, 2018 CU1 and 2018 DA". Northolt Branch Observatories. Retrieved 10 May 2018. 
  14. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 10 May 2018. 

External links[edit]