3752 Camillo

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3752 Camillo
Discovery [1]
Discovered by E. F. Helin
M. Barucci
Discovery site Caussols (010)
Discovery date 15 August 1985
Designations
MPC designation (3752) Camillo
Named after
Camillo (son of King Turno and son of discoverer)[2]
1985 PA
Apollo · NEO[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 39.65 yr (14,481 days)
Aphelion 1.8397 AU
Perihelion 0.9870 AU
1.4133 AU
Eccentricity 0.3017
1.68 yr (614 days)
166.63°
0° 35m 11.76s / day
Inclination 55.559°
147.98°
312.21°
Earth MOID 0.0782 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions ~ 2.3 km[4]
2.306±0.088 km[5][6]
2.328 km[7]
2.33 km (taken)[8]
37.846 h[9]
37.881±0.005 h[10]
0.210±0.036[5][6]
0.22[4]
0.2234[7]
S[8]
15.3[1] · 15.41[8][9] · 15.41±0.13[7] · 15.5[5]

3752 Camillo is an Apollo asteroid with a perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) of 0.99 AU and an orbital period of 614 days (1.68 years).[1] It has a well determined orbit with an observation arc of almost 40 years and an uncertainty parameter of 0.[1]

The asteroid was discovered on August 15, 1985 by Eleanor F. Helin and Maria A. Barucci using a 0.9-metre (35 in) telescope.[4] Lightcurve studies by Pravec in 1998 suggest Camillo has an elongated shape with a diameter of about 2.3 km and takes 38 hours to rotate.[4]

The closest point between the orbit of the Earth and the orbit of Camillo (Earth MOID) is currently 0.07955 AU (11,901,000 km; 7,395,000 mi)[1] so Camillo does not come close enough to Earth to qualify as a potentially hazardous asteroid. Camillo came to perihelion on 1976-Jan-06 and on 1976-Feb-17 Camillo passed 0.08013 AU (11,987,000 km; 7,449,000 mi) from Earth.[1]

2013 passage[edit]

Camillo came to perihelion on 27 December 2012.[1] On 12 February 2013 the asteroid passed 0.14775 AU (22,103,000 km; 13,734,000 mi) from Earth[1] and had an apparent magnitude of 13.[4] During the 2013 passage the asteroid was studied by radar using Goldstone and Arecibo.[4]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named for the son of the early Roman King Turno. "Camillo" is also the name of the discoverer's son.[2] Naming citation was published on 20 May 1989 (M.P.C. 14633).[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 3752 Camillo (1985 PA)" (2015-09-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (3752) Camillo. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 317. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  3. ^ "3752 Camillo (1985 PA)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (November 15, 2012). "3752 Camillo Goldstone Radar Observations Planning". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 2012-11-23. 
  5. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  6. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (December 2011). "NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 743 (2): 17. arXiv:1109.6400Freely accessible. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743..156M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/156. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (3752) Camillo". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Pravec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Sarounová, Lenka (November 1998). "Lightcurves of 26 Near-Earth Asteroids". Icarus. 136 (1): 124–153. Bibcode:1998Icar..136..124P. doi:10.1006/icar.1998.5993. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  10. ^ Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Behrend, R.; Carry, B.; Delbo, M.; et al. (February 2016). "New and updated convex shape models of asteroids based on optical data from a large collaboration network" (PDF). Astronomy and Astrophysics. 586: 24. arXiv:1510.07422Freely accessible. Bibcode:2016A&A...586A.108H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201527441. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 

External links[edit]