4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)

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4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)
Bisamine.png
Names
IUPAC name
4-[(4-Amino-3-chlorophenyl)methyl]-2-chloroaniline
Other names
•4,4'-Methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline)
•Cyanaset
•Quodorole
•Dacpm
•Curalin M
•Diamet Kh
•Millionate M
•Bis amine
•MOCA
•Bisamine S
Identifiers
101-14-4 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL82846
ChemSpider 7262
Jmol-3D images Image
KEGG C10999
PubChem 7543
Properties
C13H12Cl2N2
Molar mass 267.15 g·mol−1
Appearance Tan-colored pellets or flakes[1]
Odor faint, amine-like[1]
Density 1.44 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 104 to 109 °C (219 to 228 °F; 377 to 382 K)[2]
insoluble
Vapor pressure 0.00001 mmHg (20°C)[1]
Hazards
Main hazards potential occupational carcinogen[1]
NFPA 704
Flammability code 1: Must be pre-heated before ignition can occur. Flash point over 93 °C (200 °F). E.g., canola oil Health code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroform Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point 203 °C (397 °F; 476 K)
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
none[1]
Ca TWA 0.003 mg/m3 [skin][1]
Ca [N.D.][1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA, MBOCA, bisamine) is a substance used as a curing agent in polyurethane production.[3] It is a suspected human carcinogen, with a current threshold limit value of 0.01 ppm in the industrial atmosphere. Animal studies have resulted in tumor growth in the liver, lung, and bladder.[1] Employee exposure is often monitored by measurement of urinary MOCA in free and/or conjugated form.[4]

It is a weak base with a slight odor and is reactive to active metals such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and zinc.[1]

References[edit]