472 Roma

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472 Roma
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Luigi Carnera
Discovery date 11 July 1901
Designations
1901 GP
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 114.55 yr (41838 d)
Aphelion 2.7825 AU (416.26 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 2.3049 AU (344.81 Gm) (q)
2.5437 AU (380.53 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.093876 (e)
4.06 yr (1481.8 d)
14.044° (M)
0° 14m 34.62s / day (n)
Inclination 15.803° (i)
127.177° (Ω)
295.56° (ω)
Earth MOID 1.3622 AU (203.78 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.46855 AU (369.290 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.385
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 47.27±3.4 km[1]
9.8007 h (0.40836 d)
9.8007 ± 0.0009 h[2]
0.2138±0.034[1]
8.92[1]

472 Roma is an asteroid. It was discovered by Luigi Carnera on July 11, 1901. Its provisional name was 1901 GP. This asteroid was named by Antonio Abetti for the city of Rome in Italy, the native country of its discoverer.[3]

At 21:57 UT, on Thursday, July 8, 2010, this 50 km wide asteroid occulted the star Delta Ophiuchi in an event lasting about five seconds. The occultation path crossed central Europe along a band that ran through Stockholm, Copenhagen, Bremen, Nantes and Bilbao. This was the only asteroid occultation event visible to the naked eye during the 21st century.[4]

This is a member of the dynamic Maria family of asteroids that were probably formed as the result of a collisional breakup of a parent body.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Yeomans, Donald K. "JPL Small-Body Database Browser". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 1 July 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  2. ^ Sheridan, Edwin E. (2003). "Rotation periods and lightcurve photometry of 322 Phaeo and 472 Roma". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 30 (2): 28. Bibcode:2003MPBu...30...28S. ISSN 1052-8091. 
  3. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names. Physics and astronomy online library (5th ed.). Springer. p. 52. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. 
  4. ^ Koschny, Detlef (July 2, 2010). "Watch While an Asteroid Eats a Star". Space Situational Awareness. ESA. Archived from the original on 7 July 2010. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  5. ^ Veeder, G. J.; et al. (March 1995), "Eos, Koronis, and Maria family asteroids: Infrared (JHK) photometry", Icarus, 114, pp. 186–196, Bibcode:1995Icar..114..186V, doi:10.1006/icar.1995.1053, CiteSeerX: 10.1.1.31.2739. 

External links[edit]