51st State (song)

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This article is about the New Model Army song. For idea of a 51st state of the US, see 51st state. For the film, see The 51st State.
"51st State"
Single by New Model Army
from the album The Ghost of Cain
B-side "Ten Commandments"
"A Liberal Education" (live)
"No Rest" (live)
"No Man's Land" (live)
Released September 1986
Format 7", 12"
Genre Rock, Post-punk
Label EMI
Writer(s) Ashley Cartwright, New Model Army
Producer(s) Glyn Johns
New Model Army singles chronology
"Brave New World"
(1985)
"51st State"
(1986)
Adrenalin EP
(1986)

"51st State" is a single by New Model Army, which appeared on their 1986 album The Ghost of Cain. It protests about what it describes as "the obedience of the United Kingdom under Margaret Thatcher to United States interests". Its lyrics were written by Ashley Cartwright of The Shakes. The lyrics to the song were believed to be behind a ban by the American Musician's Union on the band, which prevented them touring the Ghost of Cain album in the United States.[1]

The track was released as a single, on EMI and reached 71 in the UK Singles Chart,[2] spending just two weeks in the listing. It was the band's fourth appearance in that chart.

Formats and track listing[edit]

UK 7" single (NMA 4)
  1. "51st State" (Ashley Cartwright, New Model Army)
  2. "Ten Commandments" (Justin Sullivan)
UK 12" single (12 NMAS 4)
  1. "51st State"
  2. "Ten Commandments"
  3. "A Liberal Education" (live) (Sullivan, Stuart Morrow)
  4. "No Rest" (live) (Sullivan, Morrow, Robert Heaton)
  5. "No Man's Land" (live) (Sullivan)
UK 12" single doublepack (12 NMA 4D)
Disc one
  1. "51st State"
  2. "Ten Commandments"
Disc two (PSLP 348)
  1. "A Liberal Education" (live)
  2. "No Rest" (live)
  3. "No Man's Land" (live)
Holland 12" single (2018046)
  1. "51st State"
  2. "Ten Commandments"
  3. "A Liberal Education" (live)
  4. "No Rest" (live)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Robert Heaton obituary". The Independent. Retrieved 4 January 2016. 
  2. ^ "51st State Chart History". chartarchive.org. Retrieved 20 January 2016.