788 Hohensteina

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788 Hohensteina
Discovery [1]
Discovered by Franz Kaiser
Discovery site Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory
Discovery date 28 April 1914
Designations
MPC designation (788) Hohensteina
Named after
Hohenstein
1914 UR
Main belt[2]
Orbital characteristics[2][3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 101.75 yr (37166 d)
Aphelion 3.54161 AU (529.817 Gm)
Perihelion 2.71025 AU (405.448 Gm)
3.12593 AU (467.632 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.132977
5.53 yr (2018.7 d)
172.396°
0° 10m 42.002s / day
Inclination 14.3373°
177.840°
48.4689°
Earth MOID 1.72663 AU (258.300 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.50036 AU (224.451 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.153
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
51.84±1.7 km[2][4]
37.176 ± 0.004 hours [5]
29.94 h (1.248 d) [2]
0.0787 ± 0.005 [4]
C[6]
8.3 [7]
8.7 [2]

788 Hohensteina is a main-belt asteroid discovered on April 4, 1914, by Franz Kaiser at Heidelberg-Königstuhl State Observatory.[1] Named for castle Hohenstein located in the Taunus mountains.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU: Minor Planet Center. Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. Retrieved December 21, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "788 Hohensteina (1914 UR)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 May 2016. 
  3. ^ "(788) Hohensteina". AstDyS. Italy: University of Pisa. Retrieved December 21, 2008. 
  4. ^ a b Tedesco; et al. (2004). "Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey (SIMPS)". IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on January 17, 2010. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
  5. ^ Oey; et al. (2008). "Lightcurve Analysis of 788 Hohensteina". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (4): 148. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..148O. 
  6. ^ Neese (2005). "Asteroid Taxonomy". EAR-A-5-DDR-TAXONOMY-V5.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on January 17, 2010. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
  7. ^ Tholen (2007). "Asteroid Absolute Magnitudes". EAR-A-5-DDR-ASTERMAG-V11.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on June 17, 2012. Retrieved December 26, 2008. 
  8. ^ Schmadel, Lutz (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names (fifth ed.). Germany: Springer. p. 74. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2008-12-27. 

External links[edit]