Accompaniment

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Definition[edit]

Mozart's Piano Sonata, K 545 opening. About this sound Play 

Accompanist is one who plays an accompaniment. A number of classical pianists have found success as accompanists rather than soloists; arguably the best known example is Gerald Moore, well known as a Lieder accompanist. In some American schools, the title collaborative pianist (or collaborative artist) is replacing the title accompanist.

The term accompanist also refers to a musician (typically a pianist) who plays for singers, dancers, and other performers at an audition or rehearsal—but doesn't necessarily participate in the ensemble that plays for the final performance.

Accompaniment figure[edit]

An accompaniment figure is a musical gesture used repeatedly in an accompaniment, such as:

Notated accompaniment may be indicated obbligato (obliged) or ad libitum (at one's pleasure).

Dialogue accompaniment[edit]

Dialogue accompaniment is a form of call and response in which the lead and accompaniment alternate, the accompaniment playing during the rests of the lead and providing a drone or silence during the main melody or vocal.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ van der Merwe, Peter (1989). Origins of the Popular Style: The Antecedents of Twentieth-Century Popular Music, p.320. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-316121-4.

External links[edit]

The dictionary definition of accompaniment at Wiktionary