Acetic acid (medical use)

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Acetic acid
Acetic-acid-2D-flat.png
Chemical formula of acetic acid
Clinical data
Pronunciationa-SEE-tik
Trade namesAcetasol, Vasotate, Acid Jelly, Domeboro Otic, others
SynonymsVinegar
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
Routes of
administration
ear drops
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC2H4O2
Molar mass60.052
3D model (JSmol)

Acetic acid, which at low concentrations is known as vinegar, is used as a medication to treat a number of conditions. As an eardrop it is used to treat infections of the ear canal.[1] It may be used with an ear wick.[2] As a liquid it is used to flush the bladder in those who have a urinary catheter in an attempt to prevent infection or blockage.[3] As a gel it may be used to adjust the pH of the vagina.[4] It may also be applied to the cervix to help detect cervical cancer during screening.[5]

Side effects may include burning at the site of application.[6] Allergic reactions may rarely occur.[6] Use is not recommended in the ear in people who have a hole in the eardrum.[7] It works against both bacterial and fungal causes of external ear infections.[7]

Acetic acid has been used medically since the time of Ancient Egypt.[8][9] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[10] Acetic acid is available as a generic medication.[2] In the United States a course of treatment with the ear preparation costs less than 25 USD.[2] Acetic acid is more commonly used for external ear infections in the developing world than the developed.[11]

Medical uses[edit]

Acetic acid may be applied to the cervix to help detect cervical cancer during screening in many areas in the developing world.[5] Acetic acid is applied to the cervix and if an area of white appears after about a minute the test is positive.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Acetic acid (otic) medical facts from Drugs.com". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Hamilton, Richart (2015). Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopoeia 2015 Deluxe Lab-Coat Edition. Jones & Bartlett Learning. p. 252. ISBN 9781284057560.
  3. ^ "Acetic Acid". The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 8 January 2017.
  4. ^ "Acetic acid gel: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  5. ^ a b c Fokom-Domgue, J; Combescure, C; Fokom-Defo, V; Tebeu, PM; Vassilakos, P; Kengne, AP; Petignat, P (3 July 2015). "Performance of alternative strategies for primary cervical cancer screening in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy studies". BMJ (Clinical research ed.). 351: h3084. PMC 4490835. PMID 26142020.
  6. ^ a b "Acetic acid otic Side Effects in Detail - Drugs.com". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Acetic Acid - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  8. ^ Cook, Larry (2005). The Beginner's Guide to Natural Living: How to Cultivate a More Natural Lifestyle to Lose Weight, Prevent Degenerative Disease, Improve Your Energy and Attain Vibrant Health. EcoVision Communications. p. 107. ISBN 9780975536186. Archived from the original on 2017-01-16.
  9. ^ Cumston, C. G. (2013). The History of Medicine. Routledge. p. Chapter 2. ISBN 9781136194252. Archived from the original on 2017-01-16.
  10. ^ "WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (19th List)" (PDF). World Health Organization. April 2015. Archived (PDF) from the original on 13 December 2016. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  11. ^ Desai, Bobby; Desai, Alpa (2016). Primary Care for Emergency Physicians. Springer. p. 36. ISBN 9783319443607. Archived from the original on 2017-01-16.