Albert Estcourt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Albert Estcourt
Bornc. 1832
Painswick, Gloucestershire
Died18 February 1909
Gloucester
ResidenceGloucester
NationalityBritish
OccupationBuilder
Known forConstructing:

Albert Estcourt (c. 1832 – 18 February 1909) was a builder in Gloucestershire in the 19th-century who with his brother, and later on his own, constructed a number of notable buildings in the county and across southern England.

Some of his buildings are Hillfield House in Gloucester (1867–69), now grade II listed; major restoration work at St Mary's Church, Cheltenham (1877); in 1880–81 the Oxford University Cricket Club Pavilion (the Parks Pavilion) to a design by Sir Thomas Graham Jackson; and in 1881–86, Clouds House in Wiltshire.

Early life and family[edit]

Albert Estcourt was born in Painswick, Gloucestershire, around 1832 to William and Maria Estcourt. He was christened on 27 May 1832 at Painswick.[1] The 1851 census shows him as a stone mason, lodging at St Mary's Square in Gloucester with the publican Joseph Gardner.[2]

Career[edit]

The former Gloucester Court of Probate, built by Oliver Estcourt in 1858.[3]
Hillfield House, Gloucester, built by Albert Estcourt, 1867–69.[4]
Clouds House, Wiltshire, built by Albert Estcourt, 1881–86. (shown after reconstruction following a fire)[5]

Albert Estcourt was at first in partnership with his brother Oliver Estcourt who died on 23 January 1871.[6] Oliver was responsible for the construction in 1858[3] of the grade II listed Gloucester Court of Probate by Thomas Fulljames of Fulljames & Waller.[7]

Estcourt worked with leading architects on buildings throughout Gloucestershire[8] and across southern England. His buildings include Hillfield House in Gloucester (1867–69) to a design by John Giles for the timber merchant Charles Walker, now grade II listed and described as the "most elaborate Victorian house in Gloucester";[4][9] major restoration work at St Mary's Church, Cheltenham (1877);[10] and in 1880–81 the Oxford University Cricket Club Pavilion (the Parks Pavilion) to a design by Sir Thomas Graham Jackson.[11]

A major work was the construction in 1881–86 of Clouds House in Wiltshire,[5] now grade II* listed with Historic England.[12]

Personal life[edit]

Estcourt married Ellen[13] who was born at Coaley.[14] At the time of the 1871 census he was living in South Hamlet, on the southern edges of Gloucester, with Ellen, four children and one servant. He was described as a "builders manager".[15] In the 1881 and 1891 censuses he and his wife were recorded as living in Barton Street in Gloucester with seven children and two servants.[13][16]

In 1897 he owned the Middletown estate in Upleadon which he sold in 1898.[17]

Death and legacy[edit]

Estcourt died on 18 February 1909. His address at the time of his death was Falkland House, Denmark Road, Gloucester. He left an estate of £55,987 and probate was granted to George Oliver Estcourt, builder, and Charles William Estcourt, timber merchant.[18]

The Escourts are remembered in Estcourt Road, built in the 1930s near Albert's home in Denmark Road.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albert Estcourt England Births and Christenings, 1538–1975. Family Search. Retrieved 9 April 2018. (subscription required)
  2. ^ Albert Escourt England and Wales Census, 1851. Family Search. Retrieved 9 April 2018. (subscription required)
  3. ^ a b Jordan, Christine. (2015). Secret Gloucester. Stroud: Amberley Publishing. pp. 38–39. ISBN 978-1-4456-4689-3.
  4. ^ a b Historic England. "Hillfield House (1271659)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  5. ^ a b Dakers, Caroline. (1993). Clouds: The Biography of a Country House. New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 63–64. ISBN 978-0-300-05776-8.
  6. ^ "Oliver Estcourt, Deceased", The London Gazette. 8 August 1871. p. 3528.
  7. ^ Historic England. "3 & 4, Pitt Street (1245683)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  8. ^ Gloucester, 1835–1985: Economic development to 1914. British History Online. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  9. ^ Verey, David & Alan Brooks. (2002). The Buildings of England Gloucestershire 2: The Vale and the Forest of Dean. 3rd edition. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. p. 501. ISBN 9780300097337.
  10. ^ Cheltenham, St Mary: Anglican Parish. National Archives. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  11. ^ University Parks. University of Oxford. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  12. ^ Historic England. "Clouds House (1131142)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  13. ^ a b Albert Estcourt England and Wales Census, 1891. Family Search. Retrieved 9 April 2018. (subscription required)
  14. ^ Albert Estcourt England and Wales Census, 1901. Family Search. Retrieved 10 April 2018. (subscription required)
  15. ^ Albert Estcourt England and Wales Census, 1871. Family Search. Retrieved 11 April 2018. (subscription required)
  16. ^ Albert Estcourt England and Wales Census, 1881. Family Search. Retrieved 11 April 2018. (subscription required)
  17. ^ Manor and Estates: Upleadon Manor; Other Estates. Upleadon Village. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  18. ^ 1909 Probate Calendar, p. 139.
  19. ^ Gloucester, 1835–1985: Topography. British History Online. Retrieved 9 April 2019.

External links[edit]

Media related to Albert Estcourt at Wikimedia Commons