Alex Moir

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Alex Moir
AM Moir 1959.jpg
Personal information
Born (1919-07-17)17 July 1919
Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
Died 17 June 2000(2000-06-17) (aged 80)
Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 53) 17 March 1951 v England
Last Test 14 March 1959 v England
Career statistics
Competition Test First-class
Matches 17 97
Runs scored 327 2102
Batting average 14.86 16.42
100s/50s 0/0 0/8
Top score 41* 70
Balls bowled 2650 18648
Wickets 28 368
Bowling average 50.64 24.56
5 wickets in innings 2 25
10 wickets in match 0 5
Best bowling 6/155 8/37
Catches/stumpings 2/- 44/-
Source: Cricinfo, 1 April 2017

Alexander McKenzie Moir (17 July 1919 – 17 June 2000) played 17 Tests for New Zealand in the 1950s as a leg-spinner and lower-order batsman.

Domestic career[edit]

In 1953-54 Moir took 15 for 203 for Otago against Central Districts at Pukekura Park, New Plymouth.[1] After making his first-class debut at 30, in 54 matches for Otago from 1949-50 to 1961-62 he took 282 wickets at an average of 21.01.

International career[edit]

On his Test debut, he took six wickets in the first innings against England in Christchurch in 1951.[2]

He is one of only two bowlers to have bowled consecutive overs in a Test innings; this occurred on 28 March 1951, the fourth day of the Wellington Test, on either side of the tea interval.[3] The other recorded instance of this violation of the Laws of cricket in a Test match was in 1921, the bowler being Warwick Armstrong.

International record[edit]

Test 5 Wicket hauls[edit]

# Figures Match Opponent Venue City Country Year
1 6/155 1  England Lancaster Park Christchurch New Zealand 1951
2 5/62 7  England Eden Park Auckland New Zealand 1955

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Central Districts v Otago 1953-54
  2. ^ "1st Test: New Zealand v England at Christchurch, Mar 17-21, 1951". espncricinfo. Retrieved 2011-12-13. 
  3. ^ Martin-Jenkins, C. (1983) The Cricketer Book of Cricket Disasters and Bizarre Records, Century Publishing: London. ISBN 07126 0191 0.

External links[edit]