Ann Trason

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Ann Trason (born August 30, 1960) is an American ultramarathon runner from Auburn, California.[1] She set 20 world records during her career and is considered to be the most successful female ultrarunner of all time.[2][3]

Life[edit]

Trason was a top runner in high school, but a knee injury kept her from competing in college and injuries plagued her throughout her running career including not finishing her first two entries to the Western States 100.[4][2][5]

Trason's ultra career began when she entered the 1985 American River 50 Miler at age 24[2] and both won and set a course record. She returned 8 years later and dropped her time by an hour to establish the 6:09 female course record that still stands.[citation needed]. Trason's Western States career began in 1987, but was not able to finish it until 1989 when she was first female finisher.[6]She has won Western States 14 times in all, most recently in 2003.[2] She held the women's division course record for 18 years (17:37:51, set in 1994) until it was broken by Ellie Greenwood in 2012.[7]

Trason appears in Christopher McDougall's accounts of the Leadville Trail 100 in the 1990s in his 2009 book, Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen. Her time of 18:06:24 in the 1994 Leadville is the women's course record.[8]

In both 1996 and 1997 Trason performed the "double" of winning the Western States 100 just 12 days after winning the 56-mile Comrades Marathon in South Africa.

Trason and her ex-husband and training partner Carl Andersen co-directed the Dick Collins Firetrails 50 from 2000 through 2010.[9] Trason set the female course record on the Firetrails 50 the one time she ran it, in 1987.[6]

After a decade away from running, Trason returned to the sport as crew and an occasional racer in 2013.[4] She was a multi-year UltraRunner of the Year, and in 2020, she was inducted into the American Ultrarunning Hall of Fame. [10][1][11]

Course records[edit]

  • 6:09:08 – American River 50 mile (1993)
  • 3:59:32 – Cool Canyon Crawl 50K (1993)
  • 7:31:24 – Dick Collins Firetrails 50 mile (1987)
  • 6:13:54 – Hunter Thompson 50 mile
  • 18:06:24 – Leadville Trail 100 women's record (2nd place overall in 1994)[12]
  • 8:55:49 – Miwok 100K Trail Race (2001)
  • 6:43:52 – Quicksilver 50 mile (1992)
  • 7:29:36 – Silver State 50 mile (1994)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pecoraro, Nick (11 January 2021). "A class of her own: Hall of Fame comes knocking for Western States legend Trason". goldcountrymedia.com. Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "Legends of the Trail". Trail Runner Magazine. 2020-02-24. Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  3. ^ "IAU Records Table" (PDF). International Association of Ultrarunners. Retrieved 2 February 2021.
  4. ^ a b Homer, Jill (2015-02-20). "Pushing through the pain: ultrarunner Ann Trason makes a quiet comeback". the Guardian. Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  5. ^ Austin Murphy (July 25, 1994). "Hot on the Trail". Sports Illustrated.
  6. ^ a b Sarah Lavender Smith (January 10, 2009). "Catching Up with Ultra Legend Ann Trason". Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  7. ^ "Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run Course Records". wser.org. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  8. ^ Erin Strout (May 25, 2015). "A Running Life: Ann Trason". Runner's World. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  9. ^ Hicks, Meghan (2014-02-05). "Ann Trason: The Pioneer Returns". iRunFar. Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  10. ^ "American Ultrarunning Hall of Fame". ultrarunninghistory.com. Retrieved December 23, 2020.
  11. ^ "UltraRunners of the year - historical". Ultrarunning Magazine. 2014-12-26. Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  12. ^ Born to Run, by Christopher McDougall. Alfred A. Knopfe, New York, 2009

External links[edit]