Antilopini

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Antilopini
Great and small game of Africa - an account of the distribution… (1899) (14568941119).jpg
Antidorcas (top left), Gazella ♂♂ (nos. 2 – 8), Eudorcas ♂♂ (bottom left & right)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Antilopinae
Tribe: Antilopini
Hassanin & Douzery, 2003
Genera

Antilopini is a tribe of medium-sized gazelles and dwarf antelopes[1] that live in and around the Sahara, Horn of Africa, throughout eastern and southern Africa, and Eurasia. Depending on species, the females have either very short and/or thin horns compared with the males, or no horns at all. They have smooth and glossy tan and white coats. Most species have black stripes and facial markings. They have a territorial male as a leader in herds and sometimes group with other species, such as Grant's gazelle joining with Thomson's gazelle.[2] They can reach top speeds of 50 miles per hour (80 km/h) and have the ability to jump and turn sharply. They have adapted well to running in open environments.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kingdon, J. 2015. The Kingdon Field Guide to African Mammals. Academic Press, London and New York: NaturalWorld.
  2. ^ "Gazelle Tribe: Antilopini". The Living Africa. Retrieved 17 February 2014.
  3. ^ Huffman, Brent. "Subfamily Antilopinae". Retrieved 17 February 2014.