Antonio Carbonchi

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Antonio Carbonchi was a 17th-century guitarist and composer who wrote two influential books on lute playing.

Biography[edit]

Cabonshi was born in Florence, sometime around the year 1600.[1] He joined the army of Tuscany in its war against the Turks, and for his courage in battle he was made a Knight of the Order of Tuscany.[1] After his military service he became a musician, specializing in innovative music for the guitar family.[1][2]

Publications and writings[edit]

Carbonchi's first book, Sonate de chitarra spagnola con intavolatura franzese, was published in Florence in 1640.[3] This book was dedicated to Mattias de' Medici as a patron of music.[3] The music in this book is written in French-style lute tabulature, regardless of whether the music was to be plucked or strummed.[3] Carbonchi wrote that the French notation was in response to requests by his foreign students.[4]

Carbonchi's second book, Dodici chitarre spostate, was published in Florence in 1643.[5][6] This volume was dedicated to the Marchese Bartolomeo Corsini.[2] The final 32 compositions contained in this work are written for twelve guitars, each guitar tuned to a different note on the chromatic scale.[5] Although such an ensemble is unlikely, it empirically proved the guitar's utility as a chromatic instrument.[5][6]

In addition to the two published works, there exist manuscripts known to be by Carbonchi, as well as those attributed to him.[7]

Style[edit]

Carbonchi's compositions consist of music written in the Italian dance styles, including the Ciacconda, Passacaglia, and Spagnoletta various dance-songes.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bone, Philip J. (1914). The Guitar & Mandolin: Biographies of Celebrated Players and Composers for These Instruments. London: Schott & Co. p. 63.
  2. ^ a b Negri, Giulio (1722). Istoria degli scrittori fiorentini. A. Forni. p. 57.
  3. ^ a b c d Tyler, James; Sparks, Paul (2002). The Guitar and Its Music: From the Renaissance to the Classical Era. Oxford University Press. p. 72. ISBN 9780198167136.
  4. ^ Eisenhardt, Lex (2015). Italian Guitar Music of the Seventeenth Century: Battuto and Pizzicato. Boydell & Brewer. p. 226. ISBN 9781580465335.
  5. ^ a b c Tyler, James; Sparks, Paul (2002). The Guitar and Its Music: From the Renaissance to the Classical Era. Oxford University Press. p. 61. ISBN 9780198167136.
  6. ^ a b Eisenhardt, Lex (2015). Italian Guitar Music of the Seventeenth Century: Battuto and Pizzicato. Boydell & Brewer. p. 88. ISBN 9781580465335.
  7. ^ Tyler, James; Sparks, Paul (2002). The Guitar and Its Music: From the Renaissance to the Classical Era. Oxford University Press. pp. 84, 93. ISBN 9780198167136.