Arieh O'Sullivan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Arieh O'Sullivan
Born (1961-03-22) March 22, 1961 (age 57)
Nationality  United States
 Israel
Occupation Journalist, author, soldier
Notable credit(s) The Media Line (Editor; 2009-present)
Jerusalem Post (Defense Correspondent; 1996-2006)
Associated Press (Foreign Correspondent; 1989-96)

Arieh O'Sullivan (Hebrew: אריה אוסליבן‎; born March 22, 1961) is an author, journalist, soldier, and award-winning defense correspondent[1] who has covered Israel and the Middle East for over two decades.[2]

He currently serves as an anchor and reporter at Israel Public Radio's English News.[3][4][5] O'Sullivan was raised in Louisiana and Mississippi[6][7] and moved to Israel in 1981.

He served as a paratrooper in the 1982 Lebanon War[8] and was discharged in 2008 from the reserves. In 2012, he was inducted into the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Biloxi, Mississippi.[9] He earned a BA in Mass Communications from the University of Minnesota.[10]

Early years[edit]

Raised in New Orleans, Louisiana, O'Sullivan's father Fred (later Efraim) O'Sullivan was a Jewish convert from Catholicism.[7][11]

Media career[edit]

Before joining The Jerusalem Post, O'Sullivan worked for seven years as a correspondent for The Associated Press based in Jerusalem and covered the peace processes, the Gulf War in 1991, Palestinian unrest, the Rabin assassination, immigration from Ethiopia, as well as the civil war in Rwanda.[10] He was a Knight Journalism fellow at Stanford University in 2002–03.[12] He was a Hoover Media Fellow at Stanford University in 2012.[13]

O'Sullivan served as Director of Communications for the Anti-Defamation League's Israel office from 2006-08. He was the bureau chief of The Media Line, a non-profit American news agency covering the Middle East.[10] He is best known for his former role as a defense correspondent and analyst for The Jerusalem Post, the Middle East's leading English-language daily,[14] where he worked for over 10 years.[15] He appears as a guest commentator on a variety of world radio and television news programs and has reported from the Rwanda, the Palestinian territories, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, Lebanon, Turkey, and China.[14]

Srigim[edit]

O'Sullivan is a founding member of the ecological village of Srigim in the Elah Valley in central Israel.[16][17] He currently lives in an Ottoman-era castle in Agur.[18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'Post' reporter wins JDC journalism award", encyclopedia.com; accessed January 11, 2018.
  2. ^ "The Media Line: Management and Staff". Archived from the original on May 16, 2010. Retrieved May 27, 2010.
  3. ^ web|url=http://www.jpost.com/Features/InThespotlight/Article.aspx?id=276437|title=Israel News - The Jerusalem post|website=www.jpost.com
  4. ^ "MK begs PM to save English news".
  5. ^ Klein, Steven (23 October 2015). "Rank and File: Timekeepers in Ra'anana" – via Haaretz.
  6. ^ "Dad Knew Who Killed JFK", pajamasmedia.com; accessed January 11, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Kraft, Dina (30 October 2017). "How Oswald's Childhood Friend Found Himself in Israel and Ended Up 'Helping the Mossad'" – via Haaretz.
  8. ^ "Israel News - The Jerusalem post". www.jpost.com.
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 13, 2012. Retrieved September 17, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c Alumni Notes, University of Mississippi School of Journalism, sjmc.umn.edu; accessed January 11, 2018.
  11. ^ "Israeli redneck Arieh O'Sullivan gets his Confederate stripes".
  12. ^ Knight Fellowships Class of 2003 Archived June 23, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-01-27. Retrieved 2013-01-02.
  14. ^ a b Reporting the Middle East, abc.net.au; accessed January 11, 2018.
  15. ^ Palestine: Information with Provenance, cosmos.ucc.ie; accessed January 11, 2018.
  16. ^ High on life, haaretz.com; accessed January 11, 2018.
  17. ^ Riding the holy wind, jpost.com; accessed January 11, 2018.
  18. ^ "From '80s to today, Israeli 'family' revels in close ties".
  19. ^ "A story of a house".

External links[edit]